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A Rare WW1 Royal Flying Corps Creagh Osbourne Air Compass For Fighters

In it's original case, with mounting base plate and screws. Constructed of brass, aluminum, and glass, the compass proper is supported by three arms projecting horizontally from a vertical circular aluminum base plate. Baseplate has four holes for mounting to A/C instrument panel. Compass is ball shaped, with glass viewing port. A brass correction device is brazed to the top of the compass. A circular compass needle is mounted on a needle point inside the compass body, with enamelled direction marks. The viewing glass is held in place by a brass retaining ring, which is marked: "Air Compass Type 5/17 No. 44693H." An ID plate is mounted on the base plate and marked "H. Hughes & Son Ltd./ London/ Creagh Osbourne/ Patent 1148/ 15, 17736/ 15??It is set in it's original RFC wooden case with affixing screws for the aircraft and an attached small electrical wired tube with screw thread." Captain Frank Osborne Creagh-Osborne (1867/1943) was Superintendent of Compasses at the Admiralty and a British inventor. He developed several compass systems which were manufactured by H. Hughes & Son Ltd, Dent & Co & Johnson Ltd and also by Sperry Gyroscopes and wrote several books about the development and use of aerocompassesHenry Hughes was born in 1816. In 1838 Henry Hughes & Son was founded at 120 (later at 59), Fenchurch Street, London as a maker of chronographs and scientific instruments. Henry died in 1879 and his son Alexander J. succeeded him as chairman. The firm was incorporated as Henry Hughes & Son Ltd in 1903. Hughes & Son worked together with Captn. Creagh-Osborne among other inventors. During the early part of the war, the RFC supported the British Army by artillery co-operation and photographic reconnaissance. This work gradually led RFC pilots into aerial battles with German pilots and later in the war included the strafing of enemy infantry and emplacements, the bombing of German military airfields and later the strategic bombing of German industrial and transportation facilities.

At the start of World War I the RFC, commanded by Brigadier-General Sir David Henderson, consisted of five squadrons ? one observation balloon squadron (RFC No 1 Squadron) and four aeroplane squadrons. These were first used for aerial spotting on 13 September 1914, but only became efficient when they perfected the use of wireless communication at Aubers Ridge on 9 May 1915. Aerial photography was attempted during 1914, but again only became effective the next year. By 1918, photographic images could be taken from 15,000 feet, and interpreted by over 3,000 personnel. Parachutes were not available to pilots of the RFC's heavier than air craft ? nor were they used by the RAF during the First World War ? although the Calthrop Guardian Angel parachute (1916 model) was officially adopted just as the war ended. By this time parachutes had been used by balloonists for three years.

On 17 August 1917, South African General Jan Smuts presented a report to the War Council on the future of air power. Because of its potential for the 'devastation of enemy lands and the destruction of industrial and populous centres on a vast scale', he recommended a new air service be formed that would be on a level with the Army and Royal Navy. The formation of the new service would, moreover, make the under utilised men and machines of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) available for action across the Western Front, as well as ending the inter service rivalries that at times had adversely affected aircraft procurement. On 1 April 1918, the RFC and the RNAS were amalgamated to form a new service, the Royal Air Force (RAF). The RAF was under the control of the new Air Ministry. After starting in 1914 with some 2,073 personnel, by the start of 1919 the RAF had 4,000 combat aircraft and 114,000 personnel in some 150 squadrons.

Code: 20175

1650.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A King Airship Co. of Washington, Historic Stock Certificate August 1920

On December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers were the first to fly in a powered and controlled aircraft. Previous flights were lighter than air vehicles, gliders (control but no power) or free flight (power but no control), but the Wright brothers combined both, setting the new standard in aviation records.

There have been many booms and busts in the aviation industry. The earliest known aviation stock certificate for a company that actually made a flying airship called the Novelty Air Ship Company in 1888. The Novelty Air Ship Company manufactured the vehicle for Professor Peter C. Campbell who was the inventor. Unfortunately, the air ship was lost at sea in 1889 while being test flown by Professor Hogan during an exhibition flight. This historic document was printed by the Goes Company and has an ornate border around it with a vignette of a Bald eagle. This item has the signatures of the Company?s Secretary and the President and is over 93 years old.

Code: 17807

235.00 GBP


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A Piece Of Zeppelin L32 Shot Down 24.9. 1916 In Ring Form 5.2 cm Across

Made into the form of a gigantic finger ring. Beautifully constructed. Group Captain Frederick Sowrey, DSO, MC, AFC (25 July 1893 - 21 October 1968) began his career as a World War I flying ace credited with thirteen aerial victories. He was most noted for his first victory, when he shot down Zeppelin L32 during its bombing raid on England. Having risen rapidly in rank during the war, he remained in service until 1940. Piece of the framework of German naval airship L32. This airship was shot down by 2nd Lieutenant Frederick Sowrey of 39 Squadron RFC on the night of 23/24 September 1916. It crashed near Billericay in Essex resulting in the death of all 21 crew members. The airship was under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Werner Peterson. Sowrey was decorated with the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) for his action.

Code: 18013

375.00 GBP


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An Exceptional German Officers Sword With Eagle and Swastika Hilt

Gilt hilt with all original mirror gilt remaining, Swastika and Eagle langet, made by Alcoso. Alcoso of Solingen scales logo [Alexander Coppel GmbH Dove head pommel with eagle and swastika shield shaped quillon and deluxe oak leaf backstrap. Overall in fabulous condition. The German Army (German: Heer, was the land forces component of the Wehrmacht, the German armed forces, from 1935 to 1945. The Wehrmacht also included the Kriegsmarine (Navy) and the Luftwaffe (Air Force). During World War II, a total of about 15 million soldiers served in the German Army, of whom about seven million became casualties. Separate from the army, the Waffen-SS (Armed SS) was a multi-ethnic and multi-national military force of the Third Reich. Growing from three regiments to over 38 divisions during World War II, it served alongside the army but was never formally part of it.

Only 17 months after Hitler announced publicly the rearmament program, the Army reached its projected goal of 36 divisions. During the autumn of 1937, two more corps were formed. In 1938, four additional corps were formed with the inclusion of the five divisions of the Austrian Army after the Anschluss in March. During the period of its expansion by Adolf Hitler, the German Army continued to develop concepts pioneered during World War I, combining ground (Heer) and air (Luftwaffe) assets into combined arms teams. Coupled with operational and tactical methods such as encirclements and the "battle of annihilation", the German military managed quick victories in the two initial years of World War II, prompting the use of the word Blitzkrieg (literally lightning war, meaning lightning-fast war) for the techniques used.

The German Army entered the war with a majority of its infantry formations relying on the horse for transportation. The infantry remained foot soldiers throughout the war; artillery also remained primarily horse-drawn. The motorized formations received much attention in the world press in the opening years of the war, and were cited as the main reason for the success of the German invasions of Poland (September 1939), Norway and Denmark (April 1940), Belgium, France and Netherlands (May 1940), Yugoslavia (April 1941) and the early campaigns in the Soviet Union (June 1941). However their motorized and tank formations accounted for only 20% of the Heer's capacity at their peak strength. The maker of this fine sword had a most interesting history and somewhat reflective of the whole fate of Germany and it persecuted people during this era. Alexander Coppel was the youngest son of Solingen entrepreneur Gustav Coppel . After finishing his studies, he graduated and joined the family business Alexander Coppel, producing steel products and edged weapons, and in a Hildener produced steel pipes.
Like his parents Coppel was active in his community and social aspects of Solingen, and curator of the "Coppelstifts", a foundation with infant home and recreation centre for adults, which was launched in 1912 by his family. On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of its founding, the company donated, from Alexander Coppel in 1921, two million marks for social purposes. However tragically, after the German transfer of power to the Nazis in 1933, the Jewish family Coppel was harassed and persecuted by the Nazis. Alexander Coppels sister in law, Sophie (1875-1951) emigrated in 1934, with her son Heinz and his family, to Switzerland. In 1936 the company was assimilated by Nazi control. On March 1, the Hildener works, was merged with another company, and the Solingen branch was acquired by "Aryan" shareholders in April.

Code: 19685

895.00 GBP


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A Spectacular Ladies Gold Rolex Mystery Watch, With a Diamond & Ruby Bracelet Described as Possibly The Most Beautiful and Extravagant Ladies Rolex Watch in the World

This would make a very special and most wonderful New Year present. A unique, bespoke cased, Rolex watch, probably one of the most spectacular to be seen on the open market today, that once belonged to movie legend, Elizabeth Taylor. The watch movement is hidden within the spectacular gold diamond and ruby set 'belt and buckle' bracelet, when worn the watch is entirely concealed, and must be viewed by simply lifting the end of the belt tab. The current cost of a 1970's Bulgari serpenti 'mystery' watch, the closest equivalent available on the market, is from £60,000 to £170,000. But, we believe, the Bulgari versions have nothing like the beauty of this one. This watch's story; In the middle of October 1970 Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton arrived in Brighton for the location filming of Burton's latest film, Villain. During the filming they toured the [South] Lanes in Brighton and visited our shop in Prince Albert St. During their hour long visit to our store some extraordinary business was transacted, between Elizabeth and Camilla Hawkins [Mark and David's mother, and wife of their father David] Camilla bought from Elizabeth, this most spectacular custom made, Rolex movement, gold and diamond bracelet 'mystery' watch that Richard had recently bought for Elizabeth. It was the culmination of a conversation that Elizabeth had with David and Camilla concerning the purchase of a Hove mansion, that Michael Wilding [a once very famous British actor and another former husband of Elizabeth Taylor] was trying to buy from David Hawkins snr, for Michael Wilding's 'other' ex wife, Susan Wilding. That most curious conversation evolved into a heated discussion between Elizabeth and Richard concerning a ring that Elizabeth had seen in a neighbouring jewellers in the Brighton Lanes that Elizabeth wanted to buy for herself, but Richard forbade her from buying. He strongly protested, and loudly argued, that he was the only one allowed to buy her Jewellery, and Elizabeth, took great exception to this affront to her independence. In high dudgeon she removed this Rolex watch from her wrist, and immediately sold it to Camilla, most likely in order to frustrate and annoy Richard, and very possibly to also demonstrate her independence of his opinions and wishes. So, the upshot was, Camilla gained this magnificent watch that October, and subsequently, a few years later, gave it to Mark [her son] as a wedding present in 1978. Mark was in fact present when the argument between Elizabeth and Richard took place and the watch was bought from Elizabeth, in the shop on that grey but significantly eventful October day in 1970. it was, he says, certainly one of the most curious and unforgettable days he had ever experienced in the shop during the past 50 years. Dame Elizabeth Taylor had another, very similar quality diamond and gold 'Mystery' watch, and she was photographed wearing it on the set of Cleopatra in 1962 [see the gallery photos] It was a Serpent Mystery Watch with a very similar watch encased hidden within the head of a diamond and gold coiled snake bracelet, by Bulgari. That watch was sold in December 2011 for over $974,500, however that watch had the benefit of a photograph of Elizabeth wearing it, so far we have never found a photograph of Elizabeth wearing this one. It was said that to custom hand-make and replicate this unique, finest quality gold, diamond and ruby bracelet watch, with the manual 'fold-out' movement by Rolex, it would likely cost over a million dollars today. Over the past near 40 years we have combed the world of photographs of Elizabeth Taylor to find her wearing it, sadly without success, and when she created her magnificent book on her world famous jewel collection it was thirty years after this magnificent Rolex had been sold. A photo in the gallery is of Richard and Elizabeth arriving at Brighton Station on the 16th October 1970, she may well have been wearing it then, but her arms are obscured by her jaguar print pant suit. We also show views from her famous jewel collection book,' Elizabeth Taylor, My Love Affair With Jewellery' published in 2002, that we also include with the watch. The watch is being sold in part to benefit Mark and Judy's [Mark's late wife] favourite charities, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and The Guide Dogs for The Blind Association. 10.5 inches long x 1.4 inches wide at the buckle, 130.8 grams. Bears Swiss .750 hallmark 24 diamonds and 40 rubies. There was once a small card with it from Elizabeth that doubled as it's receipt, but sadly it was lost many decades ago. After meeting on the set of Cleopatra in the early '60s, actress Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011) and actor Richard Burton (1925-1984) began one of the most publicized and turbulent love stories of all time, captivating millions with their on-again, off-again relationship. Despite the drama, they shared a love that was deep and fierce, the kind of love that can often be as destructive as it is beautiful. According to TIME, Burton admitted he was making movies due to his desire for money, not a love for the art. However, he thought quite highly of his talented wife. He once wrote, "You are probably the best actress in the world, which, combined with your extraordinary beauty, makes you unique. When, as an actress, you want to be funny, you are funnier than W.C. Fields; when, as an actress, you are meant to be tragic, you are tragic." We recommend this watch is professionally serviced before wearing which we will undertake. Over the decades we have sold many watches, mostly military but we have never seen another watch so beautiful as this. A true work of the finest object d'art as well as a piece of useful and functional jewellery. It will come with a signed statement from Mark Hawkins, but there is no longer any surviving paperwork from Elizabeth Taylor. However, if one wished for Rolex to create such a fabulous bespoke watch today it would very likely cost up to a million pounds. Set in a fine Cartier box . Another photo in the gallery is of Elizabeth's other 'Mystery Watch' but by Bulgari, which she was photographed wearing on the set of Cleopatra. It sold in 2011 for $974,500. The bespoke case was custom made by an exclusive, though unmarked, finest Parisian or Swiss jeweller, such as for example, Van Cleef & Arpels or Boucheron, and then fitted with its fold-out hidden Rolex movement.

Code: 22793

180000.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A WW2 Issue British FS Knife 3rd Pattern in Original Scabbard

Just arrived, a small but superb original collection of WW2 special forces knives. In very good condition with most original blueing to the blade, good tip and its only fault is the scabbard elastic band is separated. Hilt with a no 4 mould cast hilt. Prices of original WW2 FS knives for collectors seems to know no limit, we have seen them almost double in the past two years alone The cast grips themselves were outsourced to foundries who specialized in such work. From the various Wilkinson memorandums that have survived, ‘four’ such companies have been identified. This is an important detail as the grips have a small ‘mould number’ as part of the casting located just below the pommel (shown below). These numbers are always 1, 2, 3 or 4. These numbers are believed to be a method of identifying the manufacturer to better aid in quality control. These four makers are as follows:
J. Maybry of London
Perry Bar Metal Co of Birmingham
Walsall Die Casting Ltd
Wolverhampton Die Casting Company

With further examination of the records it has been possible to link the last of these makers (Wolverhampton Die Casting Ltd) to the mould-number ‘4’. To date it has not been possible to allocate any of the other numbers to a specific maker. The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England in 1940.
In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940 for a force that could carry out raids against German occupied Europe.. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Initially drawn from within the British Army from soldiers who volunteered for special service, the Commandos' ranks would eventually be filled by members of all branches of the United Kingdom's armed forces and a number of foreign volunteers from German-occupied countries.

Reaching a wartime strength of over 30 individual units and four assault brigades, the Commandos served in all theatres of war from the Arctic circle to Europe and from the Middle East to South-East Asia. Their operations ranged from small groups of men landing from the sea or by parachute to a brigade of assault troops spearheading the Allied invasions of Europe and Asia.

Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea'

The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "...the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain."

Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised.

In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company.

Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn [author of Get Tough] had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife. It came from a collector of original WW2 British Fighting knives, whose uncle originally acquired most of them in service, and he was a serving commando in WW2 , in 6 Commando. His surname was Allen known as ‘Uncle Bill’, [but his first name was not Bill, he just preferred that apparently]

Code: 23450

550.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Good, Untouched Since WW2, Wooden Handled FS Knife, Possibly For RAF or USAAF Air Crew

Just arrived, a small but superb original collection of WW2 special forces knives. Set in a US M6 Pattern scabbard with steel protection plate and coffin shaped seam rivets. The bottom scabbard protection plate was to ensure the blade tip didn't protrude from the scabbard on high impact landing by parachute. Although it is believed they were intended for RAF aircrew they were universally used by some men of all the armed services, so a definitive answer may never be agreed upon. We show in the gallery another wooden handled example of a Fairbairn Sykes close combat knife, in an original period WW2 photo, it is clearly affixed to an RAF Pilot's Mae West life jacket, taken in France in 1944, that will reinforce the aircrew argument for their use in WW2. It is easily seen that this dagger has been untouched since the war and it certainly saw considerable service, includinga rusty blade and the loss if its blade tip. But, for us that is absolutely part of its character and history. We haven't even so much as cleaned it lightly, we leave it exactly 'as is' for its next owner to decide one way or another.The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England in 1940.
In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940 for a force that could carry out raids against German occupied Europe.. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Initially drawn from within the British Army from soldiers who volunteered for special service, the Commandos' ranks would eventually be filled by members of all branches of the United Kingdom's armed forces and a number of foreign volunteers from German-occupied countries.

Reaching a wartime strength of over 30 individual units and four assault brigades, the Commandos served in all theatres of war from the Arctic circle to Europe and from the Middle East to South-East Asia. Their operations ranged from small groups of men landing from the sea or by parachute to a brigade of assault troops spearheading the Allied invasions of Europe and Asia.

Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea'

The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "...the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain."

Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised.

In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company.

Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn [author of Get Tough] had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife. It came from and through a collector of original WW2 British Fighting knives, whose uncle originally acquired most of them in service, and he was a serving commando in WW2 , in 6 Commando. His surname was Allen known as ‘Uncle Bill’, [but his first name was not Bill, he just preferred that apparently]

Code: 23449

750.00 GBP


Shortlist item
An Exceptional Original British Special Forces IInd Pattern WW2 FS Knife With Scabbard

Just arrived, a small but superb original collection of WW2 special forces knives. A very good second pattern Fairbairn Sykes commando knife. Brass crosshatch engraved hilt, and a straight blued quillon. With its brass chaped 3/4 scabbard, and the blade has much of its original blueing, the crossguard stamped broad arrow and B2.
Prices of original WW2 FS knives for collectors seems to know no limit, we have seen them almost double in the past two years alone. A very good 2nd pattern, the so called 'Officers' type. The model that was made after the 1st pattern was discontinued from the 12th August 1942 until 1943.6 3/4 inch blade. The story about the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting knife starts in England in 1940.
In 1940 the British formed special commandos to carry out raids. The initiative came from Winston Churchill in 1940 for a force that could carry out raids against German occupied Europe.. On the 8 June 1940, Section M09 of the War Office was brought into being. The name commando was taken from small effective mobile Boer units during the war in South Africa 1899-1902. Initially drawn from within the British Army from soldiers who volunteered for special service, the Commandos' ranks would eventually be filled by members of all branches of the United Kingdom's armed forces and a number of foreign volunteers from German-occupied countries.

Reaching a wartime strength of over 30 individual units and four assault brigades, the Commandos served in all theatres of war from the Arctic circle to Europe and from the Middle East to South-East Asia. Their operations ranged from small groups of men landing from the sea or by parachute to a brigade of assault troops spearheading the Allied invasions of Europe and Asia.

Two of the first instructors were Captain William Ewart Fairbairn (b. 28 February 1885, d. 20 June 1960) and Captain Eric Anthony Sykes (b. 5 February 1883, d. 12 May 1945). These middle aged gentlemen trained the young soldiers in a new and difficult mode of close-combat fighting at the Commando Basic Training Centre, Achnacarry, Scotland. Churchill described the commandos as 'a steel hand from the sea'

The need for a proper fighting knife, for these commandos, was apparent from the first few weeks of training specialized personnel. As Fairbairn later wrote, "...the authorities did not recognize a fighting knife as part of the equipment of the fighting services. In fact, such a thing as a fighting knife could not be purchased anywhere in Great Britain."

Until now, there had never been an official knife for the British armed services, although many types of knife had been authorised for use in the past. Bowie style knives were carried by some of the Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War of 1900-1901, and in World War I cut-down bayonets, privately purchased hunting knives, or captured German issue folding knives were extensively utilised.

In November 1940 there was a meeting between W. E. Fairbairn, E. A. Sykes and Robert Wilkinson Latham at Wilkinson Sword Company.

Fairbairn and Sykes described the type of knife they envisioned and the purpose for which it was intended. As discussion continued, preliminary sketches were drawn up and modified time and time again. As Robert Wilkinson Latham tells it: 'In order to explain exactly their point, the two men rose to their feet and one, it was Fairbairn my grandfather mentioned, grabbed the wood ruler from his desk and the two men danced around the office in mock combat'. W. E. Fairbairn [author of Get Tough] had also brought with him an example of a suitable fighting knife.


The system they devised utilised techniques drawn from Jiu Jitsu, Gatka, Kung Fu and 'Gutter Fighting'. It proved extremely effective. They were natural choices for the job. Both had served in the Shanghai Municipal Police Force, facing death daily in the dark, narrow streets and alleys of the city against armed thugs and organised gangs. In Shanghai they had made some fighting knives out of bayonets. The meeting resulted in the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife, that was manufactured, firstly, into the 1st pattern FS Knife, it was to then evolve, briefly, into the 2nd pattern FS Knife in August 1942 and eventually into the 3rd pattern, in around October 1943. The 3rd pattern is still in use today. This is very good example of these highly sought after early 2nd types. It came from a collector of original WW2 British Fighting knives, whose uncle originally acquired most of them in service, and he was a serving commando in WW2 , in 6 Commando. His surname was Allen known as ‘Uncle Bill’, [but his first name was not Bill, he just preferred that apparently]

Code: 23446

Reserved


A GIFT VOUCHER FOR ANY AMOUNT CAN BE WITH YOU WITHIN THE HOUR !

A Gift Voucher is often the ideal solution to leave the decision of the item to choose to the person you wish to gift. They can be with you via email within the hour, if you call us direct during opening hours, or by the next day if you contact us out of hours. They are simple to print off at home, and sometimes it can be the perfect solution to that last minute need during these difficult times. They are available from us for all values, and as required, and are entirely bespoke to the recipient. All are unique and customised for each and every occasion. We have priced this sample example as our £200.00 voucher, but you can specify any alternative amount at all in the 'comment' section in the Webstore Order page, or call us direct. Our unique bespoke Gift Vouchers are valid without time limit for use at the recipients convenience at any time in the future. Just call 01273 321357 or 07721 010085

Code: 19531

Price
on
Request


A Superb, Original, American Poster, Printed in 1932, of the USA in WW1

A Historical Map of the American Expeditionary Force. Shown in a temporary plasticated frame for protection [hence reflections]. Very rarely do these originals appear, reprints, however, are readily available. The United States was a formal participant in World War I from April 6, 1917 until the war's end on November 11, 1918. Before entering the war, the US had remained neutral, though the US had been an important supplier to Britain and other Allied powers. During the war, the US mobilized over 4,000,000 military personnel and suffered 110,000 deaths, including 43,000 due to the influenza pandemic. The war saw a dramatic expansion of the US government in an effort to harness the war effort and a significant increase in the size of the US military. After a slow start in mobilizing the American economy and manpower, by spring 1918 the U.S. was poised to play a decisive role in the conflict. Under the leadership of President Woodrow Wilson the war represented the climax of the Progressive Movement as it claimed to bring reform and democracy to the world. 28" x 35"

Code: 17887

365.00 GBP


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