WW1 / WW2 / 20th Century

357 items found
basket0
A Pair of Very Good German Kriegsmarine Officer's Wehrmacht ‘Dienstglas’Binoculars, Maker Code ddx, By Voightlander & Sohn AG, Braunschweig. 6 X 30 & Marked with Naval Eagle and Marine 'M'

A Pair of Very Good German Kriegsmarine Officer's Wehrmacht ‘Dienstglas’Binoculars, Maker Code ddx, By Voightlander & Sohn AG, Braunschweig. 6 X 30 & Marked with Naval Eagle and Marine 'M'

Naval black finish, very good and crisp optics, nicely marked and with original strap. A most scarce Kriegsmarine service issue pair, as almost 70% of all that were purchased for the Kriegsmarine, before and during WW2, were lost in combat.

We show in the gallery exactly the same pair as this, worn by Konteradmiral (Rear Admiral) Oskar Kummetz, of the Kriegsmarine Heavy Cruiser Blucher, before it was sunk during the invasion of Norway. The Admiral Hipper class heavy cruiser Blücher (launched 1937), was the lead ship of the German armada headed for Oslo, Norway, and was sunk in the Oslofjord by Norwegian military at Oscarsborg Fortress during the Battle of Drøbak Sound on 9 April 1940, the first day of the German invasion of Norway (part of the Norwegian Campaign in World War II).

By sinking the ship the Norwegian king and government were saved from being taken captive in the first hours of the invasion. The number of casualties is unknown, but the loss of life probably ranges between 600 and 1,000 soldiers and sailors. The wreck remains on the bottom of the Oslofjord. The admiral did not perish in the sinking, but was captured, for a brief period, but later released.

The Kriegsmarine can be said to have consisted of three main components between 1935 and 1945, individual naval vessels, naval formations consisting of specific types of ships, and a wide variety of ground-based units. From these three main components, the Kriegsmarine fielded thousands of ships and hundreds of naval formations and ground units. Between 1939 and 1945 over 1.5 million served in the Kriegsmarine. Over 65,000 were killed, over 105,000 went missing and over 21,000 were wounded.

Of all the branches of the Wehrmacht, the Kriegsmarine was the most under-appreciated, likely due in part as it was the least NAZI of the armed forces, and Hitler never truly trusted his navy as much as his other services. It fought against superior numbers on almost every front with a force greatly limited by a lack of effective coordination and a harsh misunderstanding from within the German High Command (OKW). Although Allied air and naval power largely destroyed the entire German High Seas Fleet and U-boat force, the smaller and auxiliary vessels of the Kriegsmarine continued to serve effectively until the last hours of WWII. These vessels saw service along thousands of miles of coast in every theater of war and provided an important link in the backbone of the Wehrmacht.

German naval ground units also provided a critical service during WWII, manning massive guns along the Atlantic Wall in the west and naval flak and artillery units all across Western and Eastern Europe. There were also countless naval infantry, engineer, and communications units as well. In the last months of WWII most, all of the naval ground units were involved directly in fighting of some form or another, some naval units even took part in the Battle of Berlin in 1945.  read more

Code: 25167

SOLD

A Good pair of Original WW2 Air Ministry RAF Issue Binoculars in Original Air Ministry Leather Case and Strap

A Good pair of Original WW2 Air Ministry RAF Issue Binoculars in Original Air Ministry Leather Case and Strap

A good pair of original wartime 6 X 30 binoculars and issue case. The binoculars are outwardly excellent. The grips good, data plates in nice order with clear markings AM and code. The focuses work well. The optics show no chips or damage. They are usable and not out of culmination. The internal lenses are ok but do show dirt and slight cloudy appearance. This could be cleaned as only dirt but not something that we would attempt. There is minor paint loss and wear to the metal edges and central bar from use. The case is a correct Air Ministry case. The case is in good order and complete with shoulder strap.  read more

Code: 25168

120.00 GBP

WW1 Era Quality Made Leather Holster For A .32ACP 'Model 1913' Self-Loading Pistol by Webley & Scott,

WW1 Era Quality Made Leather Holster For A .32ACP 'Model 1913' Self-Loading Pistol by Webley & Scott,

This is a service holster for the Webley small frame .32 pistol. All leather and intricate stitching are clean and intact. The rear of the holster has a single belt loop stitched to the body. It has a single brass press stud fastener and full flap cover. From muzzle end to the open top of the holster measures 10 inches. The opening is 4 1/8 inches wide.

Winston Churchill owned this form of pistol {his was sold at auction in 2015} as a personal defence weapon.
The .32 Webley & Scott was adopted by Scotland Yard for use on close protection details in 1911. Walter J. Thompson, Churchill's most famous bodyguard, carried one during his eighteen years service beside the Prime Minister.  read more

Code: 25142

145.00 GBP

A Finest Leather Field Service, .455 Revolver Holster, For WW1 Officers

A Finest Leather Field Service, .455 Revolver Holster, For WW1 Officers

Excellent condition, WW1 service officer use, for the Webley.455 MK VI revolver. It has a full flap cover with retaining strap and brass stud fastener

The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Top-Break Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various designations, a standard issue service revolver for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, and countries of the British Empire and the Commonwealth of Nations, from 1887 to 1970.

The Webley is a top-break revolver and breaking the revolver operates the extractor, which removes cartridges from the cylinder. The Webley Mk I service revolver was adopted in 1887 and the Mk IV rose to prominence during the Boer War of 1899–1902. The Mk VI was introduced in 1915, during wartime, and is the best-known model.

Firing large .455 Webley cartridges, Webley service revolvers are among the most powerful top-break revolvers produced.

The Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) model was Webley's first double-action revolver, and adopted by the RIC in 1868, hence the name. It was a solid frame, gate-loaded revolver, chambered in .442 Webley. General George Armstrong Custer was known to have owned a pair, which he is believed to have used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Shanghai Municipal Police received Webley Mk VI revolvers during the interwar period.  read more

Code: 25160

165.00 GBP

A Superb, WW1, British Officer's Field Service, Harrods 'Kit' Named 'A Welcome Present for Friends At the Front,'.  Trench Warfare Pharmaceuticals Case for Morphine, Heroin & 7% Solution Cocaine From Harrods Department Store {Now Empty!}

A Superb, WW1, British Officer's Field Service, Harrods 'Kit' Named 'A Welcome Present for Friends At the Front,'. Trench Warfare Pharmaceuticals Case for Morphine, Heroin & 7% Solution Cocaine From Harrods Department Store {Now Empty!}

Even high street stores, in the Victorian, Edwardian and George Vth era, were once involved in selling questionable products {by today's enlightened standards of course}. In London during 1916, Harrods sold a ‘kit’ named ‘A Welcome Present for Friends at the Front,’ which contained cocaine, morphine, syringes, and needles. These kits were marketed to officers for use in the trenches of WW1. This case is also personally monogrammed for the officer

We acquired this from the elderly grandson of a WW1 officer in the Guards Division, and it once contained his complete kit of drug paraphernalia, the syringe, heroin vials, cocaine etc. for his trench warfare 'downtime' during his service at the front.

A very stout hard leather case, Harrods marked, containing its original metal box that once contained his 'kit', aka ‘A Welcome Present for Friends at the Front,’ In superb condition for age especially considering when and where it was used, and for over three years in the awful conditions of the trenches in Flanders and France. It was also very functional as a 'back-up' sandwich tin, which would likely be a more sensible use for it. Swayne and Adeney {another contemporary store but in Piccadilly} made a version for 'sandwiches' but larger, with a double hinged tin {so one could remove the sandwhich} and often a small glass flask, likely for a tot of single malt whisky. Apparently the vendors grandfather told him several of his brother officers used to ask for home to send them a F/S sandwich tin, but only in order to fit their drug kit within it!

“Which is it today,“ I asked “morphine or cocaine ?“. So says Doctor Watson to Sherlock Holmes in The Sign of The Four. “It is cocaine,“ he said “a seven-per-cent solution. Would you care to try it ?“

Doctor Watson wisely declines the offer. Instead he tries to alert Holmes to the potential dangers involved in his drug taking. “Why should you, for a mere passing pleasure, risk the loss of those great powers with which you have been endowed ?“ But Sherlock Holmes finds cocaine, “…so transcendentally stimulating and clarifying to the mind that it’s secondary action is a matter of small moment.“

The attitude to drugs in the Victorian era was very different to our own. Morphine and cocaine were both available from various sources without a doctor’s prescription. Morphine was even given to children - albeit in a diluted form such as a linctus. The great psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud also wrote in praise of cocaine.

This all seems very strange to us. But before modern analgesics were developed people had to rely on drugs such as morphine and other opiates for pain relief and other medical uses.

Recreational drug taking was also not unknown. Sherlock Holmes’ drug use would certainly fall into this category. However, as he tells Doctor Watson; “Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram, or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial stimulants.“  read more

Code: 25156

395.00 GBP

A Most Scarce, Edwardian, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Regt. Long Lee Enfield 1903 Bayonet, To Fit & Use With The Long Lee Enfield & The MK III SMLE Enfield

A Most Scarce, Edwardian, 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Regt. Long Lee Enfield 1903 Bayonet, To Fit & Use With The Long Lee Enfield & The MK III SMLE Enfield

Edwardian period, maker marked by Chapman of Sheffield. Regimentally stamped, R.I, and dated 1903 and maker marked. Used from 1903 and right through WW1. Superb bright blade and russetted surface steel mounts, with steel mounted leather scabbard. The earliest WW1 Enfield Rifle Bayonet, made from the earlier 1888 bayonet pattern blade, and designed for the early Long Lee in 1903, with cleaning rod removed, yet also fitting it's pre war replacement the Short Magazine Lee Enfield. This pattern of rare bayonet was only made for four peacetime years from 1903 until 1907 when it was changed for the long blade 1907 SMLE pattern.
Made in relatively small numbers hence its rarity to survive today.

We bought the entire small collection from the widow of a 'Best of British Empire Rifles and Bayonets, Both British and German' collector, who acquired them over the past 40 years, and only ever kept the very best he could afford to keep. Act fast they are selling really fast, three rifles and eight bayonets and a cutlass have sold today alone. Top quality and condition,19th and 20th century scarce British and German collectables are always the most desirable of all.

A very brief history lesson of the 2nd Royal Irish during their first two months of WW1;
The men who served with the 2nd battalion during the first two months of the war partly because the events that unfolded between August and October 1914 are in themselves extraordinary. In a few short weeks there took place the first hostile contact between the British and the Germans at Mons, the crucial battle of Le Cateau, the long and hot retreat to the outskirts of Paris, the successes on the Marne and the stalling of the allies’ advance at the Aisne. Then, at the beginning of October 1914 the battalion was redeployed north and took part in the fighting around La Bassee. On the 20th of October at Le Pilly, they were surrounded and overwhelmed. All but 135 men and one officer were either killed, wounded and/or taken prisoner. This means that since they had disembarked in France on 14th August well over a thousand members of the battalion had become casualties. Such a casualty rate among the battalions of the First World War may not in itself be exceptional. However, what needs to be taken into account is the fact that many of those who proceeded to France with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Regiment had been serving together for years and in some cases decades. Some may have fought together in the Boer War or have had a shared experience of the hardship of years of service in India. They genuinely were comrades in arms, which must have made the destruction of this regular army battalion all the more affecting for those who survived. The first day of the Somme may well have produced equally shocking statistics. However, the close camaraderie of the regular army was by then a thing of the past and replaced by a weary acceptance of the brutalities of trench warfare and an understanding that too great an investment in those around you was best avoided. It is the poignancy of all those friendships and long-standing associations torn asunder in eight short weeks that makes this tale so compelling. ref; PATRICK63223 IWM

Ten battalions of the regiment saw service during the First World War (1914-18). They suffered over 3,200 killed in action and thousands more wounded in places such as Le-Pilly, Gullimont, Ginchy, Salonika, Mesopotamia and Palestine.

Members of the Royal Irish were also the first British Army troops to confront the Irish rebels during the Easter Rising of 1916.
The IWM 'Lives of WW1' is a remarkable website community to learn so much about the stories of the regiments and their gallant men in the Great War, heroes, one and all!  read more

Code: 25147

395.00 GBP

The Rarest Enfield 'Hook Quillon' 1907 Pattern Bayonet Issued in 1911

The Rarest Enfield 'Hook Quillon' 1907 Pattern Bayonet Issued in 1911

Probably for many collectors, especially Australian, it is the most desirable and rarest regulation bayonet ever made or issued. This is an original 1907 Pattern SMLE sword bayonet, but, most importantly, it is the early example, with its long hook quillon still intact. The adapted removed or shortened type outnumber the rare original hook quillon type, probably, by several tens of thousand to 1. This example was made in 1911, bearing it's original King Edwards Crown, with ER stamp and Enfield maker stamp. And as was standard issue to the WW1, ANZAC, Australian Light Horse. The hook quillon SMLE issue bayonet, is a the very pinnacle of Great War bayonet collecting. They were used predominantly by the Australian Infantry and Light Horse Brigade in WW1, and due to their use in Gallipoli and the dessert were never returned to the ordnance for regulatory quillon removal as was instructed. In over 45 years we have had barely a handful of these rarest full hook quillon bayonets in original condition and unaltered, but the regular type we have handled, by comparison, many many thousands in the same period of time. Australian Light horse were like mounted infantry in that they usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and as a means of swift disengagement when retreating or retiring. A famous exception to this rule though was the charge of the 4th and 12th Light Horse Regiments at Beersheba on 31 October 1917. In 1918, some light horse regiments were equipped with sabres, enabling them to fight in a conventional cavalry role in the advance on Damascus. However, unlike mounted infantry, the light horse also performed certain cavalry roles, such as scouting and screening, while mounted.
The light horse were organised along cavalry rather than infantry lines. A light horse regiment, although technically equivalent to an infantry battalion in terms of command level, contained only 25 officers and 400 men as opposed to an infantry battalion that consisted of around 1,000 men. Around a quarter of this nominal strength (or one man in each section of 4) could be allotted to horse-holding duties when the regiment entered combat. A regiment was divided into three squadrons, designated "A", "B" and "C" (equivalent to a company), and a squadron divided into four troops (equivalent to but smaller than a platoon). Each troop was divided into about 10 four-man sections. When dismounting for combat, one man from each section would take the reins of the other three men's horses and lead them out of the firing line where he would remain until called upon. By the outbreak of World War I, there were 23 light horse regiments within Australia's part-time military force, consisting of 9,000 personnel. These were organised as follows:
1st Light Horse Brigade (Queensland): 1st (Central Queensland), 2nd (Queensland Mounted Infantry), 3rd (Darling Downs), 4th (Northern Rivers Lancers) and 27th (North Queensland) Light Horse Regiments
2nd Light Horse Brigade (New South Wales): 5th (New England) and 6th (Hunter River Lancers) Light Horse Regiments
3rd Light Horse Brigade (New South Wales): 7th (New South Wales Lancers), 9th (New South Wales Mounted Rifles), 11th (Australian Horse) and 28th (Illawarra) Light Horse Regiments
5th Light Horse Brigade (Victoria): 13th (Gippsland), 15th (Victorian Mounted Rifles), and 16th (Indi) Light Horse Regiments
7th Light Horse Brigade (Victoria): 17th (Campaspe), 19th (Yarrowee), and 20th (Corangamite) and 29th (Port Phillip Horse) Light Horse Regiments
8th Light Horse Brigade (South Australia): 22nd (South Australian Mounted Rifles), 23rd (Barossa), and 24th (Flinders) Light Horse Regiments
25th (Western Australian Mounted Infantry) Light Horse Regiment
26th (Tasmanian Mounted Infantry) Light Horse Regiment. The bayonet has excellent markings to the blade and it's scabbard leather but the any surviving regt markings on the steel hilt mounts are now fully obscured by age.  read more

Code: 19952

895.00 GBP

A Scarce Original WW2 British '37 Pattern Commando Officer's 9mm Browning Hi-power Holster, Ammunition Pouch & Waistbelt 1942/3 in Excellent Plus Condition

A Scarce Original WW2 British '37 Pattern Commando Officer's 9mm Browning Hi-power Holster, Ammunition Pouch & Waistbelt 1942/3 in Excellent Plus Condition

This 3 commando holster set was acquired with a German Luftwaffe officers PPK holster but sold seperately. After WW2 the officer kept his Browning and the Walther PPK as souvenirs, but surrendered his Browning and the Walther to the police in the 1960's. We acquired both holsters from his grandson

The 9mm automatic holster was easily identifiable by its level top edge almost all revolver holsters being angled upwards. With top hooks to connect underneath an ammunition pouch as an option. The neat ammunition pouch could accommodate two 12 round packets, a fabric strip went over the brace adaptor and a fabric loop fitted at the bottom accepted the top hook of a holster. dated 42/43.

No. 3 Commando was a battalion-sized Commando unit raised by the British Army during the Second World War. Formed in July 1940 from volunteers for special service, it was the first such unit to carry the title of "Commando". Shortly afterwards the unit was involved in a largely unsuccessful raid upon the German-occupied Channel Island of Guernsey.

In 1941 they were involved in successful raids on the Lofoten Islands and Vaagso, in Norway, before taking part in the costly Dieppe raid in August 1942, where the unit was tasked with knocking out a German coastal artillery battery on the eastern flank of the main landings, although due to a chance encounter in the Channel with a German convoy, a large majority of the unit failed to make it ashore.

In early 1943, the unit was sent to Gibraltar before moving to North Africa in April from where they were involved in the Allied invasion of Sicily and operations in Italy prior to being withdrawn to Britain to prepare for Operation Overlord. On D-Day they went ashore on 6 June 1944 as part of the 1st Special Service Brigade tasked with linking up with the 6th Airborne Division on the eastern flank of Sword before being withdrawn. Later they took part in the Allied counterattack during the Ardennes Offensive in early 1945 before taking part in the advance into Germany as part of Operation Plunder.

Following the end of the war, No. 3 Commando carried out occupation duties in Germany before it was disbanded on 4 January 1946.  read more

Code: 25143

190.00 GBP

Aircrew Europe Six Medal Group, With Africa Star and 1942-43 Bar, 13th Squadron Observer, Operation Jubilee, 19/8/1942, the Dieppe Raids, with His Observer Wing {x 2} Dog Tags, Cap Badge and Silver Plate & Enamel Observer Badge

Aircrew Europe Six Medal Group, With Africa Star and 1942-43 Bar, 13th Squadron Observer, Operation Jubilee, 19/8/1942, the Dieppe Raids, with His Observer Wing {x 2} Dog Tags, Cap Badge and Silver Plate & Enamel Observer Badge

Of Sgt F.H. Westbrook -(Observer-13 Sqn)-

Operation Jubilee or the Dieppe Raid (19 August 1942) was an Allied amphibious attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe in northern France, during the Second World War. Over 6,050 infantry, predominantly Canadian, supported by a regiment of tanks, were put ashore from a naval force operating under protection of Royal Air Force (RAF) fighters.

The port was to be captured and held for a short period, to test the feasibility of a landing and to gather intelligence. German coastal defences, port structures and important buildings were to be demolished. The raid was intended to boost Allied morale, demonstrate the commitment of the United Kingdom to re-open the Western Front and support the Soviet Union, fighting on the Eastern Front.

Aerial and naval support was insufficient to enable the ground forces to achieve their objectives; the tanks were trapped on the beach and the infantry was largely prevented from entering the town by obstacles and German fire. After less than six hours, mounting casualties forced a retreat. The operation was a fiasco in which only one landing force achieved its objective and some intelligence was gathered (including electronic intelligence).

Within ten hours, 3,623 of the 6,086 men who landed had been killed, wounded or became prisoners of war. The Luftwaffe made a maximum effort against the landing as the RAF had expected, but the RAF lost 106 aircraft (at least 32 to anti-aircraft fire or accidents) against 48 German losses. The Royal Navy lost 33 landing craft and a destroyer.

Both sides learned important lessons regarding coastal assaults. The Allies learned lessons that influenced the success of the D-Day landings. Artificial harbours were declared crucial, tanks were adapted specifically for beaches, a new integrated tactical air force strengthened ground support, and capturing a major port at the outset was no longer seen as a priority. Churchill and Mountbatten both claimed that these lessons had outweighed the cost. The Germans also believed that Dieppe was a learning experience and made a considerable effort to improve the way they defended the occupied coastlines of Europe.

Fighter Command claimed to have inflicted many losses on the Luftwaffe for an RAF loss of 106 aircraft, 88 fighters (including 44 Spitfires), 10 reconnaissance aircraft and eight bombers; 14 other RAF aircraft were struck off charge from other causes such as accidents.79 Other sources suggest that up to 28 bombers were lost and that the figure for destroyed and damaged Spitfires was 70.80 The Luftwaffe suffered 48 aircraft losses, 28 bombers, half of them Dornier Do 217s from KG 2; JG 2 lost 14 Fw 190s and eight pilots killed, JG 26 lost six Fw 190s with their pilots.81 The RAF lost 91 aircraft shot down and 64 pilots; 47 killed and 17 taken prisoner, the RCAF lost 14 aircraft and nine pilots and 2 Group lost six bombers.57h Leigh-Mallory considered the losses "remarkably light in view of the number of Squadrons taking part and the intensity of the fighting" noting that the tactical reconnaissance suffered heaviest with about two casualties per squadron.83 The Luftwaffe in France was back to full strength within days of the raid. Copp wrote that Dieppe failed to inflict the knockout blow against the Luftwaffe that the RAF sought. Although the Allies continued to lose on average two aircraft for every one German aircraft destroyed for the rest of 1942, the output of fighters by the United States, Britain and Canada combined with better Allied pilot training, led to the Luftwaffe gradually losing the war of attrition in the skies above France. Copp concluded that: "The battle for air superiority was won on many fronts by continuous effort and August 19, 1942 was part of that achievement".57 The Forward Air Controller, Air Commodore Adrian Cole, was injured when Calpe was attacked and was awarded the DSO for gallantry.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite, armoury and gallery  read more

Code: 24973

795.00 GBP

A Scarce German WW1 Ersatz Gew 98 Bayonet

A Scarce German WW1 Ersatz Gew 98 Bayonet

One of the more collectable emergency production bayonets supposedly made in the last year of the war, however there is evidence that many were made from the early war period. EB10 type 4 scabbard

Excellent bright polish blade condition, much original green surface over paint present

Ersatz (substitute) bayonets were made in Germany during the early years of World War I, because there weren't enough regulation bayonets to equip the rapidly expanding army. Ersatz bayonets were manufactured in local workshops, resulting in hundreds of variations. I only have a small number of examples, however, these should aid in making a general identification. The German specification was for a 12-inch blade. In addition to newly-constructed bayonets, Ersatz Bayonets were also created by modifying captured bayonets of other countries.

12 " blade

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite, armoury and gallery  read more

Code: 24980

220.00 GBP