WW1 / WW2 / 20th Century

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Gold Metal Watch Fob, With a Zeppelin Model Top Mount Representing The Hindenburg Zeppelin, Gifted by Kapitan Max Pruss, Kapitan of the Ill Fated Zeppelin Airship LZ.129 Hindenburg. & the Hindenburg Kapitan's Saucer

Gold Metal Watch Fob, With a Zeppelin Model Top Mount Representing The Hindenburg Zeppelin, Gifted by Kapitan Max Pruss, Kapitan of the Ill Fated Zeppelin Airship LZ.129 Hindenburg. & the Hindenburg Kapitan's Saucer

Apparently given by Kapitan Max Pruss, the last Kapitan of the Hindenburg, accompanied with his boxed, original, WW2 Luftwaffe pilot's Leitz goggles, and his personal, named ‘Hindenburg’ porcelain saucer, not to be confused with the LZ standard livery porcelain, to a visiting British RAF officer in the 1950's, while he was attempting to resurrect with the post-war German government, his new Zeppelin project, with his former Hindenburg Chief Engineer, Rudolf Sauter. The fob is very heavy quality, and weighs as it should if it was solid gold, however, it bears no gold hallmark, so we cannot sell it as solid gold, and we cannot thus assume it is solid gold, therefore we offer it as ‘gold coloured metal’. The fitted Zeppelin miniature model top mount is certainly gold plate as the plate is fractionally worn in places. He Sauter worked with Captain Max Pruss, the Hindenburg's former commander, during the post-war years to try and revive the Zeppelin airships. In the early 1950s, in fact, Sauter and Pruss drew up plans for a new Zeppelin and made the case to the West German government and the press that (in Sauter's words,) "The use of Zeppelins in air traffic is absolutely economical. The West German government is planning to spend 150 million marks on a new airline flown by airplanes. We would need only 50 million marks to build new Zeppelins." Sauter showed the new Zeppelin plans to Dr. Hugo Eckener, by then in his late 80s and retired. As Eckener later told a news reporter, "I told him that he had my blessing, but that I do not want to have anything to do with it. Today, a Zeppelin would not have a chance against an airplane.". More photos of the fob and saucer to follow tomorrow. One photo in the gallery Is of Kapitan Pruss, with a fellow Kapitan Von Schiller colleague making a time check while aboard the Hindenburg.

Kapitan Pruss commanded the Zeppelin airship, Hindenburg, during its tragic explosion and destruction in Lakehurst, America. Amazingly he survived but with severe burns.

The Hindenburg disaster was an airship accident that occurred on May 6, 1937, in Manchester Township, New Jersey, United States. The German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg caught fire and was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at Naval Air Station Lakehurst. The accident caused 35 fatalities (13 passengers and 22 crewmen) from the 97 people on board (36 passengers and 61 crewmen), and an additional fatality on the ground.

The disaster was the subject of newsreel coverage, photographs and Herbert Morrison's recorded radio eyewitness reports from the landing field, which were broadcast the next day.A variety of hypotheses have been put forward for both the cause of ignition and the initial fuel for the ensuing fire. The publicity shattered public confidence in the giant, passenger-carrying rigid airship and marked the abrupt end of the airship era.

We also have a souvenir German porcelain Hindenburg saucer from the captain’s personal porcelain set, said by Pruss to have been given to him by Hitler’s deputy, Herman Goring, however, if so, this must have been before the dramatic argument and falling out between Goring and Pruss at Frankfurt Airport in 1940.

Pruss was the commander of the airship during the Hindenburg disaster of 6 May 1937. This was his first time commanding a trip to Lakehurst. Pruss and several crew members rode the Hindenburg down to the ground as it burned, then ordered everybody out. He carried radio operator Willy Speck out of the wreckage, then looked for survivors until rescuers were forced to restrain him. Pruss, however, suffered extensive burns and had to be taken out by ambulance to Paul Kimball Hospital in Lakewood. The burns were so extensive that he was given last rites, but although his face was disfigured for the rest of his life, his condition improved over the next few months. Pruss was unable to testify at investigative committees, but officially he was not held responsible.

Pruss, along with other airship crewmen, maintained that the disaster was caused by sabotage, and dismissed the possibility that it was sparked by lightning or static electricity. Although Hugo Eckener did not rule out other causes, he criticized Pruss' decision to carry out the landing in poor weather conditions, expressing his belief that sharp turns ordered by Pruss during the landing approach may have caused gas to leak, which could have been ignited by static electricity. Pruss insisted that such turns were normal procedure, and that the stern heaviness experienced during the approach was normal due to rainwater being displaced at the tail.

Apparently Kapt. Pruss was exceptionally polite, and the exchange of gifts was most warmly given and received.  read more

Code: 24145

995.00 GBP

An Amazing Original Souvenir of Tank Warfare in WW2. A German 88mm Tiger Tank Shell, Superior Early War Brass Case Type, High Explosive, Ground Combat, Impact Fuze AZ23

An Amazing Original Souvenir of Tank Warfare in WW2. A German 88mm Tiger Tank Shell, Superior Early War Brass Case Type, High Explosive, Ground Combat, Impact Fuze AZ23

Shell case in brass and dated Photo in the gallery of Hitler inspecting different forms of 88mm rounds. Rare German WW2 88mm Shell Used by the German 88 mm Cannon during WW2. A simply superb example, impact fuze AZ23 with a 1938 brass shell case. The world famous 88's were the bane of the Allies in WW2. The 88 millimetre cannon and the Tiger Tank 88 cannons fired these huge shells. Superb maker codes stamps etc. with full Waffenamt Nazi Eagle markings. To get an impression of the difference between the size and power of Allied shells against the German equivalent, in 1942 an Allied Tank Round was approximately the size of a small Coca Cola bottle, the German Tank Shell was the size of a small child!. The 88 performed well in its original role of an anti-aircraft gun, and it proved to be a superb anti-tank, and anti-soft skinned vehicle gun as well. Its success was due to its versatility: the standard anti-aircraft platform allowed gunners to depress the muzzle below the horizontal, unlike most of its contemporaries. During the initial stages of the war, as it was becoming increasingly clear that existing anti-tank weapons were unable to pierce the armour of heavier enemy tanks, gunners were more likely to put the weapon to use against enemy tanks, a situation that was aided by the prevalence of the 88 among German forces.

Similarly to the anti-aircraft role, as an anti-tank weapon the 88 was tactically arranged into batteries, usually four guns to each. The higher-level tactical unit was, most commonly, a mixed anti-aircraft battalion (Flak-Abteilung, gemischte). It totalled 12 such guns on average, supplanted by light cannons.

The German Condor Legion made extensive use of the 88 in the Spanish Civil War, where its usefulness as an anti-tank weapon and a general artillery piece exceeded its role as an anti-aircraft gun.The success of the 88 caused the Allies to take steps to defend against it in new tank designs. On July 18 and 19 1944 a Luftwaffe 8.8 cm anti-aircraft battery was re-purposed by then Major Hans von Luck to attack British tanks near Cagny taking part in Operation Goodwood. 20 tanks were killed by these guns within the first few seconds and at least 40 tanks were knocked out by 88's during the engagement.

Not suitable to export, for sale to over 18s only, safe inert and empty 37 inches high  read more

Code: 25132

1275.00 GBP

Front Page of the Evening News Sept 6th 1938. 'Hitler's First Message', From the Nuremberg Rally

Front Page of the Evening News Sept 6th 1938. 'Hitler's First Message', From the Nuremberg Rally

A most intriguing original historical souvenir of Hitler's National Socialist pre-war Germany in 1938 during his rise to power, and the start of his imminent move to all out total war, and the destruction of freedom throughout all Europe.

5-12 September 1938. Nuremberg. The last X Party Rally called ‘Reichsparteitag Großdeutschland’ (The Congress of Great Germany) once again praised the triumphs of the Third Reich, including the Annexation of Austria six months before. The grand opening was accompanied by Wagner’s ‘Meistersinger von Nürnberg’ opera to inspire Hitler himself and Goebbels with enthusiasm. This Party Congress was the last of that kind as the XI Rally, pre-planned as the “The Party Conference of Peace” for September 1939 was denied on the threshold of the invasion of Poland.

Nürnberg Rally, the massive Nazi Party rallies held in 1923, 1927, and 1929 and annually from 1933 through 1938 in Nürnberg (Nuremberg) in Bavaria. The rallies were primarily propaganda events, carefully staged to reinforce party enthusiasm and to showcase the power of National Socialism to the rest of Germany and the world.

The emotional power generated by the rallies has been preserved in films, most notably in Leni Riefenstahl’s classic Triumph des Willens (1935; Triumph of the Will), which presents a carefully orchestrated version of the 1934 rally.

The paper has discoloured areas and the left hand side is hand torn, but its interest in a historical context more that makes up for it. It would be ideal for framing  read more

Code: 25128

95.00 GBP

An Excellent, WW1 Wilkinson Sword 1897 Pattern Infantry Officers King George Vth Period. Used In WW1 & WW2 Yet Still Perfect For Use Today

An Excellent, WW1 Wilkinson Sword 1897 Pattern Infantry Officers King George Vth Period. Used In WW1 & WW2 Yet Still Perfect For Use Today

Apparently completely refurbished by Wilkinson sword around 20 years ago.

We just acquired effectively the full set of British Infantry swords used from 1895 onwards. The Victorian 1895 pattern by Wilkinson, a Victorian 1897 pattern by Robert Mole from the British Raj in India, a King George Vth, by Wilkinson, in its WW1 FS scabbard, and a King George Vth 1897 pattern Wilkinson sword in its dress scabbard, from WW1, but also used in WW2 and still perfectly usable today, by an officer in the current service of H.M.King Charles IIIrd

This sword was used in WW1 and WW2 and due to its condition it is perfectly suitable for current service use in the army today. Pristine hilt, traditional wire bound sharkskin grip, fully etched with royal cypher and traditional devices, excellent fully bright blade also now pristine, and superb full dress scabbard. Traditional pierced half basket hilt with the cypher of King George Vth. In parade ground condition almost as it was when it was made in WW1.
The 1897 pattern Infantry officer's sword has remained unchanged to the present day.
By the time of its introduction, the sword was of limited use on the battlefield against rapid-firing rifles, machine guns and long-range artillery. However, the new sword was regarded, when needed, as a very effective fighting weapon. Reports from the Sudan, where it was used in close-quarters fighting during the Reconquest of the Sudan 1896-99, were positive.
Field Marshal Montgomery advanced with his 1897 Pattern drawn during a counter offensive in the First World War. The actual sword he carried is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum, London.

The blade is straight and symmetrical in shape about both its longitudinal axes. The thick blade has a deep central fuller on each side and is rounded on both its edge and back towards the hilt, giving a “dumbbell” or “girder” cross section. Through a gradual transition, the blade becomes double edged towards the tip, and the last 17 inches were sharpened when on active service. The blade ends in a sharp spear point.
The guard is a three-quarter basket of pressed, plated steel. It is decorated with a pierced scroll-work pattern and had the royal cypher of the reigning monarch set over the lower knuckle bow.

One of the famous British officer's of WW2, who was a devoted exponent of hand to hand sword combat, using his sword in battle, was infantry officer 'Mad' Jack Churchill. After fighting at Dunkirk, he volunteered for the Commandos. On one occasion, a general who had commented on his weaponry, Churchill is said to have replied "Any officer who goes into action without his sword is improperly dressed."

In his service in Norway (1941)
Churchill was second in command of No. 3 Commando in Operation Archery, a raid on the German garrison at Vågsøy, Norway, on 27 December 1941.  As the ramps fell on the first landing craft, he leapt forward from his position playing "March of the Cameron Men" on his bagpipes, before throwing a grenade and charging into battle. For his actions at Dunkirk and Vågsøy, Churchill received the Military Cross.

In Italy;
During the Allied invasion of Sicily
In July 1943, as commanding officer, he led No. 2 Commando from their landing site at Catania, in Sicily, with his trademark Scottish broadsword slung around his waist, a longbow and arrows around his neck and his bagpipes under his arm, which he also did in the landings at Salerno.

Leading 2 Commando, Churchill was ordered to capture a German observation post outside the town of Molina, controlling a pass leading down to the Salerno beachhead. 136–137  With the help of a corporal, he infiltrated the town, captured the post and took 42 prisoners including a mortar squad. Churchill led the men and prisoners back down the pass, with the wounded being carried on carts pushed by German prisoners. He commented that it was "an image from the Napoleonic Wars". He received the Distinguished Service Order for leading that action at Salerno.

Churchill later walked back to the town to retrieve his sword, which he had lost in hand-to-hand combat with the German regiment. On his way there, he encountered a disoriented American patrol mistakenly walking towards enemy lines. When the NCO in command of the patrol refused to turn around, Churchill told them that he was going his own way and that he would not come back for a "bloody third time"  read more

Code: 25126

575.00 GBP

An 1897 Pattern Victorian British Empire Imperial Officer's Sword, From the Victorian British Raj Period

An 1897 Pattern Victorian British Empire Imperial Officer's Sword, From the Victorian British Raj Period

Made by Robert Mole of Birmingham, and bears the fully pierced hilt, with royal cypher VRI {Victoria Regina Imperatrix} Victoria, Queen Empress.
Wooden and leather FS scabbard. With original wire bound sharkskin grip.

We just acquired effectively the full set of British Infantry swords used from 1895 onwards. The Victorian 1895 pattern by Wilkinson, a Victorian 1897 pattern by Robert Mole from the British Raj in India, a King George Vth, by Wilkinson, in its WW1 FS scabbard, and a King George Vth 1897 pattern Wilkinson sword in its dress scabbard, from WW1, but also used in WW2 and still perfectly usable today, by an officer in the current service of H.M.King Charles IIIrd

Although a Victorian antique sword, this sword would have seen service use for the following two world wars.

We show two photos in the gallery of a British Raj Colonel with his same sword, and another a portrait of a British Indian Army General holding his same Raj officer's sword.

This is also the form of sword used in the Boxer Rebellion in China by the Imperial Indian Army Regiment's officers of the 24th Punjabis and 1st Sikhs who were in fact the first to reach the Legations during the seige.

The 1897 pattern British Infantry officer's sword has remained unchanged to the present day.
By the time of its introduction, the sword was of limited use on the battlefield against rapid-firing rifles, machine guns and long-range artillery. However, the new sword was regarded, when needed, as a very effective fighting weapon. Reports from the Sudan, where it was used in close-quarters fighting during the Reconquest of the Sudan 1896-99, were positive.
Field Marshal Montgomery advanced with his 1897 Pattern drawn during a counter offensive in the First World War. The actual sword he carried is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum, London.
The blade is described in the pattern as being 32+1/2 inches (830 mm) long and 1 inch (25 mm) wide at the shoulder, with the complete sword weighing between 1 lb 12oz and 1 lb 13 oz (794-822g).

The blade is straight and symmetrical in shape about both its longitudinal axes. The thick blade has a deep central fuller on each side and is rounded on both its edge and back towards the hilt, giving a “dumbbell” or “girder” cross section. Through a gradual transition, the blade becomes double edged towards the tip, and the last 17 inches (430 mm) were sharpened when on active service. The blade ends in a sharp spear point.
The guard is a three-quarter basket of pressed, plated steel. It is decorated with a pierced scroll-work pattern and had the royal cypher of the reigning monarch set over the lower knuckle bow.

The grip, between 5 and 5 ¾ inches long to suit the hand of the owner, was generally covered in ray or sharkskin and wrapped with German-silver wire. The grip is straight, with no offset to the blade.

The sword shows a number of features that indicate its intent as a thrusting weapon. The spear point and double edge towards the point aids penetration and withdrawal by incising the wound edges. The blade, whilst quite narrow, is thick and its dumbbell section gives it good weak-axis buckling strength whilst maintaining robustness in bending for the parry. The blade tapers in both width and thickness and, with the substantial guard, has a hilt-biased balance, aiding agility at the expense of concussive force in a cut.

The leather on the wooden scabbard is excellent, with typical Raj period long scabbard chape. The hilt and blade are both very bright polished, the blade is excellent condition, the hilt has light overall aged surface marking.

This photograph/file of Col Rao Bahadur Balu Singh OBI IDSM is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. Nsshekhawat649  read more

Code: 25125

350.00 GBP

A Superb and Very Rare Imperial German Naval Service Issue Straw Hat From SMS Emden One of The Most Famous Warships of WW1, It Sunk or Captured 23 Allied Ships, and 60 Allied Ships Took Part in the ‘Hunt-for-the-Emden’ Before She Was Sunk.

A Superb and Very Rare Imperial German Naval Service Issue Straw Hat From SMS Emden One of The Most Famous Warships of WW1, It Sunk or Captured 23 Allied Ships, and 60 Allied Ships Took Part in the ‘Hunt-for-the-Emden’ Before She Was Sunk.

Bearing the wide, imperial black silk straw cap band with the embroidered badge of [SMS] Emden, with a crown over the imperial battle flag, and from family history it was used, during it's service life, on the SMS Emden's barge to transport the Kaiser to his ship before WW1, and by their sailors serving on land based duties in the concessions at Tsingtao, China from 1910. The Emden and her crew has a most significant status within German Naval history for in only three months service it sank or captured 23 ships. It fought with such valiant heroism before it was finally destroyed by the Royal Australian Navy, in November 1914, that all the surviving crew were given the singular and unique honour of having the ship's name, Emden, added as a suffix to their family surname in purpetuity. The SMS Emden was a Dresden class light cruiser launched in 1908 and posted to the East Asia squadron based at Tsingtao in 1910. She took part in the suppression of the Sokehs Rebellion on Ponape in 1910-11 and in 1913 (along with British and Japanese ships) shelled a rebel Chinese fort on the Yangtze.

When the First World War broke out the Emden, under the command of Korvettenkapitan Karl von Muller, set sail from Tsingtao to cause mayhem amongst allied shipping in the Indian Ocean and bombard enemy ports (including Madras in British India). The allies put vast efforts into catching the SMS Emden (at one point having over 60 warships involved in the search) but she eluded them, capturing and sinking thousands of tons of Entente shipping along the way. In November 1914 she was finally cornered off the Cocos Islands and sunk by the Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney. The surviving crew of the SMS Emden were uniquely honoured for their bravery by being allowed to add the suffix '-Emden' to their surnames. To this day some of their descendants still carry this additional name. She sank eighteen merchantman, converted another to an armed merchant cruiser and captured and used three colliers. She had also raided two allied ports and sank a cruiser and a destroyer as well as causing major disruption to shipping and tying down a large number of enemy warships. Throughout the voyage she had maintained an excellent reputation for "gentlemanly" behaviour, not a single person from the merchant ships she sank was killed, prisoners were well treated and released at the earliest opportunity, enemy wounded were treated as best they could and neutral ships were treated as such.SMS Emden ("His Majesty's Ship Emden") was the second and final member of the Dresden class of light cruisers built for the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine). Named for the town of Emden, she was laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft (Imperial Dockyard) in Danzig in 1906. Her hull was launched in May 1908, and completed in July 1909. She had one sister ship, Dresden. Like the preceding Konigsberg-class cruisers, Emden was armed with ten 10.5 cm (4.1 in) guns and two torpedo tubes.

Emden spent the majority of her career overseas in the German East Asia Squadron, based in Tsingtao, in the Kiautschou Bay concession in China. In 1913, she came under the command of Karl von Muller, who would captain the ship during World War I. At the outbreak of hostilities, Emden captured a Russian steamer and converted her into the commerce raider Cormoran. Emden rejoined the East Asia Squadron, after which she was detached for independent raiding in the Indian Ocean. The cruiser spent nearly two months operating in the region, and captured nearly two dozen ships. In late October 1914, Emden launched a surprise attack on Penang; in the resulting Battle of Penang, she sank the Russian cruiser Zhemchug and the French destroyer Mousquet.Muller then took Emden to raid the Cocos Islands, where he landed a contingent of sailors to destroy British facilities.
Emden then set of to raid the important wireless/cable station at the Cocos Islands, arriving at 0600 on November 9. A forty man landing party was put ashore unopposed and the Buresk was signalled to join Emden. Buresk did not reply but the the island started to transmit "S.O.S. Emden is here" both by wireless and cable. Only fifty miles to the north east the was the Anzac convoy which intercepted the transmission. HMAS Sydney (Captain Glossop) was detached from the convoy. Sydney was a modern light cruiser, her 6 inch main guns outgunning the 4.1 inch armed Emden. She left the convoy at 0700 and by exceeding her designed speed arrived at the Cocos after 0900.

At first Emden's lookouts thought Sydney was Buresk but when she was identified as a cruiser the landing party was recalled but were too slow and so at 0930 Emden pulled out of the lagoon without them.

Ten minutes alter Emden opened fire with her starboard guns at 10,000 yards, hitting with her third salvo, knocking out Sydney's range finder. Emden continued to score hits, knocking out a gun and starting a fire but by 1000 Sydney had found Emden's range. By 1020 Emden had lost her wireless station, a forward gun, her electrics and steering. She then received damage to her shell hoists and her firing became ragged. Sydney was a faster ship than Emden and throughout the action maintained a range best suited to her heavier guns. Emden's forward funnel fell across deck causing her to be shrouded in smoke and to reduce speed below twenty knots. For the next half an hour Emden was hit repeatedly, over 100 times during the entire action, and Captain Muller decided to beach her before she sank. At 1115 she was beached, Sydney ceasing fire five minutes later and setting off after Buresk which had just arrived. Buresk scuttled herself to prevent capture and Sydney returned to the Emden. She signalled Emden to ask for surrender but received no reply and as Emden was still flying her battle flag she opened fire again. Emden hauled down her battle flag and raised a white flag, ending the battle.

Sydney dropped off medical supplies then headed back to the main island to capture the landing party but when she arrived they had left in the commandeered schooner Ayesha. They eventually made it to Turkey in May 1915.
Emden lost 131 killed and sixty five wounded whilst Sydney suffered three killed and eight wounded. Karl von Muller was the last to leave Emden and spent the remainder of the war as a P.O.W.. Over a raiding career spanning three months and 30,000 nautical miles, Emden had destroyed two Entente warships and sank or captured sixteen British steamers and one Russian merchant ship, totaling 70,825 gross register tons. Another four British ships were captured and released. Another very rare surviving Imperial German Navy straw hat, from the Kaisers Yacht [the SMY Hohenzollern] but with it's Kaisersciffe title SMS Hohenzollern, we show it in our photograph gallery just as it is now exhibited in the The International Maritime Museum Collection, Hamburg  read more

Code: 20572

995.00 GBP

A Stunning Miniature Model Webley Model 1913 Automatic Pistol By Ron Platt

A Stunning Miniature Model Webley Model 1913 Automatic Pistol By Ron Platt

Made by the reknown late engineer and miniature gun maker Ron Platt. A miniature so good it is near impossible to tell from the photographs this is not a full scale original pistol. William Whiting created his full size military automatic pistol and presented it to the British Army and Navy. Whiting?s pistol was run through comparison testing against John M. Browning?s Colt M1911 and was declared to be superior to the Colt. The first official issue of the pistols was to the Royal Horse Artillery in 1913 followed by a limited issue by the Royal Navy on 14th May 1914 and the newly formed Royal Flying Corps on 26th April 1915.

Of special interest to collectors is that William Whiting had designed both military and commercial versions of his full size pistol and they were available in both the military .455 Webley Automatic calibre and in John M. Browning?s .38ACP. These Webley Automatic pistols are finished to commercial quality and were sold by some of the most prestigious London gunmakers including Holland & Holland. The gun went through a few alterations for various models but visually they are all most similar. 52m long overall  read more

Code: 21821

240.00 GBP

A Stunning British Welsh Guards Officer's Dress Tunic. Of Finest Quality Tailoring Fit For The Prince of Wales, Former Colonel of The Regiment of the Welsh Guards, {Now H.M. King Charles IIIrd, Colonel in Chief of the Welsh Guards}

A Stunning British Welsh Guards Officer's Dress Tunic. Of Finest Quality Tailoring Fit For The Prince of Wales, Former Colonel of The Regiment of the Welsh Guards, {Now H.M. King Charles IIIrd, Colonel in Chief of the Welsh Guards}

In superb condition for age, finest bespoke tailored during the reign of Her Late Beloved Majesty, Queen Elizabeth IInd.

With full traditional gold bullion. Large size. When this fabulous tunic was originally tailored it was for an officer serving under the present king, when he was Colonel of the Regiment, H.R.H, the Prince of Wales. The Colonel of the regiment is now the current Prince of Wales, H.R.H. Prince William. His wife, H.R.H. Catherine, The Princess of Wales, is now Colonel of the Regiment of the Irish Guards.

Photographed here with associated British officer's full dress scarlet and silver bullion belt, this belt is not included with tunic, it can be sold separately.

The Welsh Guards came into existence on February 26, 1915 by Royal Warrant of His Majesty King George V in order to include Wales in the national component to the Foot Guards, "..though the order to raise the regiment had been given by the King to Earl Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, on February 6 1915." They were the last of the Guards to be created, with the Irish Guards coming into being in 1900. Just two days later, the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards mounted its first King's Guard at Buckingham Palace on 1 March, 1915 - St David's Day.One way to distinguish between the regiments of Foot Guards is the spacing of buttons on the tunic. The Welsh Guards have buttons arranged in groups of five.

On March 17, 1915 the 1st Battalion sailed for France to join the Guards Division to commence its participation in the First World War. Its first battle was some months after its initial arrival, at Loos on September 27, 1915. The regiment's first Victoria Cross came two years later in July 1917 awarded to Sergeant Robert Bye.The regiment was increased to three Battalions during the Second World War. The 1st Battalion fought valiantly in all the campaigns of the North-West European Theatre. The 2nd Battalion fought in Boulogne in 1940 whilst the 1st fought in Belgium as part of the British Expeditionary Force. In May 1940 at the Battle of Arras, the Welsh Guards gained their second Victoria Cross by Lieutenant The Hon. Christopher Furness who was killed in the action. The Welsh Guards were subsequently part of the legendary Evacuation of Dunkirk that saw over 340,000 British and French troops return to the UK against all odds. In 1943 the 3rd Battalion fought throughout the arduous Tunisian North African Campaign and Italian Campaigns.
Welsh Guards in action near Cagny 19 July 1944

While they battled on in those theatres the 1st and 2nd joined the Guards Armoured Division, with the 1st Battalion being infantry and the 2nd armoured. The two battalions worked closely, being the first troops to re-enter Brussels on September 3, 1944 after an advance of 100 miles in one day in what was described as 'an armoured lash unequalled for speed in this or any other war'. Very good condition.


Photo of HRH Prince of Wales by Carfax2 - Own work
Prince Charles in the uniform of Colonel of the Welsh Guard, Trooping the Colour, June 2012
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.  read more

Code: 19022

775.00 GBP

1929 Graf Zeppelin Round the World, Meissen Medal. Beaded Rim in Caramel Brown Bisque Porcelain with Gold Edge

1929 Graf Zeppelin Round the World, Meissen Medal. Beaded Rim in Caramel Brown Bisque Porcelain with Gold Edge

From a small collection of most rare Meissen porcelain medals of the Graf Zeppelin round the world flight. three different variations of the same medal. Perfect for either early aviation and airship collectors, rare medal collectors, or collectors of finest German porcelain from the Weimar period

1929 GERMANY. 1929 Graf Zeppelin World Flight Medal. Red Porcelain, 50.7mm. Mint condition.
Obv. Airship over Eastern
Hemisphere globe, GRAF ZEPPELIN WELT
RUNDFLUG . Rev. Airship over Western Hemisphere globe, FRIEDRICHSHAFEN. TOKIO. LOS ANGELES. LAKEHURST . A classic Zeppelin
issue made by the State Porcelain Factory of Meissen, mintmark crossed swords, Kurschwertern . MEISSEN TABLE MEDAL - GRAF ZEPPELIN "AROUND THE WORLD VOYAGE" - 1929. Meissen was one of the premier makers of tableware and porcelain items in Imperial Germany. The firm is hundreds of years old, and has survived to this day. A large-format table medal that salutes the Graf Zeppelin?s (LZ-127) "Around the World Tour." The tour began in Friedrichshafen, Germany, where the Graf Zeppelin was built, and continued on to Tokyo, Los Angeles, and Lakehurst, NJ (where her sister ship, the Hindenburg, exploded in May 1937) before returning to Germany. It measures 2" in diameter and is chocolate brown. It shows hallmarking for Meissen on both sides.In 1929, the Graf Zeppelin, LZ-127, made a world flight, stopping at Friedrichshafen, Tokyo, and Los Angeles. Although the Graf was not the first aircraft to circle the globe, it took only 21 days, 7 hours, 34 minutes, a new record for round-the-world travel by any means. Furthermore, it carried a full passenger load over much previously uncharted land.

With its extraordinary fineness and silky matt surface, bisque porcelain exudes an unmistakable charm. Sculptural qualities, modelling skills and decorations such as reliefs are shown to full effect and are further accentuated by the material’s fascinating tactile quality. Developed in the 18th century by the French painter Jean-Jacques, the fine material rose to prominence as a substitute for ivory, alabaster and marble in the manufacture of the Château Vincennes. To this day, bisque porcelain is often compared to marble because of its unique way of diffusing light rather than reflecting it. At MEISSEN, this effect and material quality is achieved by polishing the unglazed surface of fired porcelain pieces in painstaking detail, resulting in the bisque's characteristic velvety soft surfaces.
Porcelain in its purest form. Contrary to popular belief, bisque porcelain has the same properties as its glazed counterparts in terms of density, hardness, strength and resistance. By omitting the glaze, details, such as sculptural swerves, elaborate embossing work and decorations, such as reliefs, are highlighted and given a unique tactile quality, showing off the skills of Meissen artisans in a particularly compelling way.  read more

Code: 25122

295.00 GBP

1929 Graf Zeppelin Round the World, White Bisque Porcelain Meissen Medal 1929

1929 Graf Zeppelin Round the World, White Bisque Porcelain Meissen Medal 1929

From a small collection of most rare Meissen porcelain medals of the Graf Zeppelin round the world flight. three different variations of the same medal. Perfect for either early aviation and airship collectors, rare medal collectors, or collectors of finest German porcelain from the Weimar period

This rare medal was made by the famous Meissen factory in Germany to commemorate the first circumnavigation of the world by an airship, the ‘Graf Zeppelin’ in August 1929. Designed by Ludwig Durr but conceived and operated by Dr Hugo Eckener, Chairman of the German company Luftschiffbau Zeppelin, the rigid airship was built at their works at Friedrichshafen between 1926 and 1928 and was intended to demonstrate the viability of intercontinental commercial air travel. It was the largest airship in the world at that time.

Co-sponsored by the American newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, the round the world flight took off from Lakehurst Naval Air Station, New Jersey, on 8 August heading east with Eckener in command. As well as the crew there were 20 passengers on board and four Hearst staff including the Australian explorer Hubert Wilkins, a cameraman and a British reporter, Lady Grace Drummond-Hay, who became the first woman to circumnavigate the world by air. Having refuelled at Friedrichshafen the flight continued across Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union to Tokyo, then on to California, landing at Los Angeles to complete the first ever nonstop flight across the Pacific Ocean. The final leg from Los Angeles to Lakehurst ended on 29 August, three weeks after the airship had departed. Actual flying time was 12 days, 12 hours, and 13 minutes, the fastest circumnavigation of the globe at the time.

The company then used the airship on its transatlantic service and for 5 years provided a commercial passenger and mail service between Germany and Brazil. ‘Graf Zeppelin’ made 590 flights totalling almost 1.7 million kilometres and was the first aircraft to fly over a million miles. It flew a total of 17,177 hours (nearly two years), without injuring a passenger or crewman. It was operated by a crew of 36, and could carry 24 passengers, who were treated to 3 hot meals a day with fine wines in the dining room and entertainment on board. The operational spaces, common areas, and passenger sleeping cabins were built into a gondola structure beneath the airframe.

Eckener had been outspoken in his dislike of the Nazi Party so that when they took power in 1933 he was replaced by his former colleague Lehmann and the ‘Graf Zeppelin’ was commandeered for a new airline. The Nazis used the airship as a propaganda tool until it was withdrawn from service after the Hindenburg disaster in 1937. The airship was scrapped and the metal airframes melted down for military aircraft production in 1940 - a dismal end for the most successful airship of all time, about which Lady Drummond-Hay had written:

“The Graf Zeppelin is a ship with a soul. You have only to fly in it to know that it's a living, vibrant, sensitive and magnificent thing”

With its extraordinary fineness and silky matt surface, bisque porcelain exudes an unmistakable charm. Sculptural qualities, modelling skills and decorations such as reliefs are shown to full effect and are further accentuated by the material’s fascinating tactile quality. Developed in the 18th century by the French painter Jean-Jacques, the fine material rose to prominence as a substitute for ivory, alabaster and marble in the manufacture of the Château Vincennes. To this day, bisque porcelain is often compared to marble because of its unique way of diffusing light rather than reflecting it. At MEISSEN, this effect and material quality is achieved by polishing the unglazed surface of fired porcelain pieces in painstaking detail, resulting in the bisque's characteristic velvety soft surfaces.
Porcelain in its purest form. Contrary to popular belief, bisque porcelain has the same properties as its glazed counterparts in terms of density, hardness, strength and resistance. By omitting the glaze, details, such as sculptural swerves, elaborate embossing work and decorations, such as reliefs, are highlighted and given a unique tactile quality, showing off the skills of Meissen artisans in a particularly compelling way  read more

Code: 25121

265.00 GBP