Antique Arms & Militaria

818 items found
basket0
A Very Fine King George III Period 'Blue and Gilt' Bladed Crab-Tree Wood Hidden Sword-Cane Circa 1820.

A Very Fine King George III Period 'Blue and Gilt' Bladed Crab-Tree Wood Hidden Sword-Cane Circa 1820.

A beautiful hidden crab-tree sword stick fitted with a very fine 'blue and gilt' blade. The blade is a diamond quatrefoil form, fancy decorated with blue and gilt, and in very good condition. Identical to the 'blue and gilt' blade in Lord Byron's sword-stick, which may indicate it was made by the same maker as Byron's.

Lord Byron's blue and gilt bladed sword stick that was exhibited in King's College London, bearing a mercurial gilt collar bearing his name, coronet and adopted surname Noel. Upon the death of Byron's mother-in-law Judith Noel, the Hon. Lady Milbanke, in 1822, her will required that he change his surname to "Noel" so as to inherit.

An interesting 19th century conversation and collector's piece, and one can ponder over of the kind of gentleman who would have sought and required such a piece of personal defence paraphernalia. Although one likes to think that jolly old England had a London full of cheerful cockneys and laddish chimney sweeps, it was also plagued with political intrigue, nefarious characters and caddish swine prowling the endless foggy thoroughfares and dimly lit passageways, and, somewhat like today, police constables were never to be seen on the streets when one’s need was dire, of course then, the police as a dedicated force had yet to be invented {by Sir Robert Peel}. The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms.

The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Although Byron was proficient in the use of pistols, his lameness and his need to defend himself in some potentially dangerous situations made a swordstick doubly useful to him. He received lessons in London from the fencing master Henry Angelo and owned a number of swordsticks, some of which were supplied by his boxing instructor Gentleman John Jackson. The name NOEL BYRON on the ferrule of his one indicated that it was used after 1822, when Byron added the surname Noel after the death of his mother-in-law.

There are several references to sword sticks in the correspondence of Byron and his circle. Byron wrote to Hobhouse from Switzerland on 23 June 1816 asking him to Bring with you also for me some bottles of Calcined Magnesia a new Sword cane procured by Jackson he alone knows the sort (my last tumbled into this lake ) some of Waite's red tooth-powder & tooth-brushes a Taylor's Pawrsanias Pausanias and I forget the other things. Hobhouse responded on 9 July: Your commissions shall be punctually fulfilled whether as to muniments for the mind or body pistol brushes, cundums, potash Prafsanias Pausanias tooth powder and sword stick.

In the entry for 22 September 1816 in Byron's Alpine Journal he describes how, at the foot of the Jungfrau,
"Storm came on , thunder, lightning, hail, all in perfection and beautiful, I was on horseback the Guide wanted to carry my cane I was going to give it him when I recollected it was a Sword stick and I thought that the lightning might be attracted towards him kept it myself a good deal encumbered with it & my cloak as it was too heavy for a whip and the horse was stupid & stood still every other peal."

In a letter to Maria Gisborne of 6-10 April 1822, Mary Shelley described the "Pisan affray" of 24 March, in which Sergeant-Major Masi was pitch-forked by one of Byron's servants. She recounted how Byron rode to his own house, and got a sword stick from one of his servants.

Sword sticks came in all qualities, and for numerous purposes, from the simplest bamboo sword cane personal defender to stout customs officer’s ‘prod’, to offensive close quarter stiletto dagger canes and even to the other side of the world in the form of Japanese samurai’s shikome-sue, hidden swords.

Overall 35.2 inches long, blade 27.75 inches.
An original antique collectable for display purposes only  read more

Code: 25261

900.00 GBP

A Beautiful 20th Century Bespoke Mahogany Locking Display Case For a 19th Century Revolver, Such As a Colt Navy or a Remington Beals Navy. Superbly Made and Fitted in Mahogany With Facsimile Tools

A Beautiful 20th Century Bespoke Mahogany Locking Display Case For a 19th Century Revolver, Such As a Colt Navy or a Remington Beals Navy. Superbly Made and Fitted in Mahogany With Facsimile Tools

A superb piece of craftsmanship, that although is not an original case of the 1860's, it is a stunning display case for any suitable sized revolver, that simply elevates it's display beautifully for a collector or interior decorator.

Polished mahogany case lined in burgundy velvet with five sections for the revolver, tools and equipment. And fitted with an embossed 20th century copper powder flask, and a 20th century double, 'bullet and ball', .36 bullet mould, and working lock and key.

The photos show a suitable Remington .36 and a Colt Navy .36 fitted in the case for demonstration purposes only.

15.75 inches x 7.5 inches x 3.5 inches  read more

Code: 25260

350.00 GBP

A Superb, Wonderful, & Highly Amusing, Antique Edwardian, Carved Automata Bulldog's Head Gadget Cane. That Is Not Only A 'Glove Holder' Handled Walking Stick, But A Superbly Secretly Concealed Sword-Stick

A Superb, Wonderful, & Highly Amusing, Antique Edwardian, Carved Automata Bulldog's Head Gadget Cane. That Is Not Only A 'Glove Holder' Handled Walking Stick, But A Superbly Secretly Concealed Sword-Stick

Superbly carved wooden bulldog's head, that has a finger trigger operated opening & closing jaw, that is spring tensioned, and upon release of the trigger it can grip a pair of gentleman's gloves. The head is superbly hand carved wood with glass eyes, carved horn ears. Inside the bulldog's mouth, the jaw is painted red and each individual tooth painted white.

The wooden haft is beautiful dark red, with black striping decoration, to simulate rosewood, and the stick contains a secret, a superbly hidden, long, quatrefoil {four sided} long sword blade. Hallmarked London silver ferrule dated 1906,
Gadget or system canes by inventive spirits are perhaps the most fascinating and most collected canes. These quirky creations feature hidden devices such as a fan, an umbrella, a bottle and drinking glass, a perfume bottle or a sword.
Sometimes also scalpels and syringes in canes for
doctors. Also, musical instruments, fishing rods, telescopes, sewing kits and corkscrews can be
hidden in the head of a cane. More than 1500 patents were applied for during the 18th and 19th
centuries. The two essential properties of the gadget cane are something hidden and a combination
of several tools or functions. In addition to the official term gadget cane, there are also the more
romantic expressions such as canes with inner life or canes with soul.
Findings from the tomb of Tutankhamun, as well as medieval bishopric staffs, prove that specially
shaped or ornate sceptres have served as symbols of power since time immemorial. But it was Louis XIII who brought the cane to importance as a royal accessory. The king, as his portraits depict, supposedly always held one in his hands. He also gave them – along with valuable snuffboxes – as gifts of honour. Accordingly, gentlemen who wanted to be fashionable never went without this accessory from that time on. At the time, these were sort of ornate rods without a curved handle that were held in the hand or carried under the arm.

The 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century became the age of the cane. The tremendous popularity then created the desire to be seen with a cane. And so a wealth of unique
pieces with practical and strange handles and a mysterious inner life were created. The painter
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, for example, owned a cane containing a bottle that held a pint of absinthe.
In the mid-18th century Saxony's prime minister, Heinrich Graf von Brühl, possessed 300 sticks to go with 300 suits, together with just as many snuffboxes which he weared in turn. King Friedrich II, too, had a huge collection of luxurious walking sticks and snuffboxes. After the Seven-Years War one particular type of sticks with a handle formed like a rope, which was King Friedrich’s constant companion, became so popular, that it was dubbed the "Fritz crutch".

Also at the end of the 19th century the "gadget cane" with additional functions was discovered. Sometimes elegant, sometimes plain, but curious and unrecognisable from the exterior, and the most varied objects and gadgets were concealed in the handle or shaft - out of expediency, or just for fun, or because the owner of the stick wanted to hide something from the general public, such as a hidden sword blade. In fact this one is especially ingenious in that it has two diversely separate functions, the main, the carved bulldog's head glove holder would amuse and thoroughly entertain, but its second secret would never even be guessed at, for gadget canes never usually have another hidden side, that would turn it from a fabulous curiosity into a defender of life in times of severe threat. One could easily imagine Dr Watson's ejaculation, " My Lord Holmes, that cane is simply ingenious! "

There was no limit to the genius of the inventors. There have been canes assigned to a certain profession: like one to the locksmiths to the doctor or one to the horse trader. With this can the height of a horse could have been measured. This explains the existence and meaning of the word “Stockmaß”.
Catherine Dike described 1600 different systems and functionings of canes in her book “Cane Curiosa”. She presents a great variety which reaches from useful canes to witty ones. On the same time have been automatic sticks invented. The handle were formed as a human or an animal head made of ivory or wood. When you press a knob they turn her eyes or her ears and they open their mouth.


The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Although Byron was proficient in the use of pistols, his lameness and his need to defend himself in some potentially dangerous situations made a swordstick doubly useful to him. He received lessons in London from the fencing master Henry Angelo and owned a number of swordsticks, some of which were supplied by his boxing instructor Gentleman John Jackson.

Sword sticks came in all qualities, and for numerous purposes, from the simplest bamboo sword cane personal defender to stout customs officer’s ‘prod’, to offensive close quarter stiletto dagger canes and even to the other side of the world in the form of Japanese samurai’s shikome-sue, hidden swords.

We show two famous sword sticks in the gallery, one that belonged to Lord Byron, and another in a Presidential Centre Library collection, a historic sword stick is part of the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Centre Library collection in Fremont, Ohio from the Waggoner family, the sword-cane was said to have been presented to Mr Waggoner by General George Washington in honour of Waggoner's service in Washington's Life Guard during the American Revolutionary War.

An original antique collectors item for display purposes only.

36 inches long overall, blade 26.25 inches.  read more

Code: 25259

2150.00 GBP

19th Century 1850's English Tranter .36 calibre Double Trigger Revolver One of the Most Favoured Revolver's of The US Civil War Confederates

19th Century 1850's English Tranter .36 calibre Double Trigger Revolver One of the Most Favoured Revolver's of The US Civil War Confederates

The Tranter revolver is a double-action cap and ball (percussion) revolver invented around 1856 by English firearms designer William Tranter (pictured below). The original Tranter’s operated with a special dual-trigger mechanism (one to rotate the cylinder and cock the gun, a second to fire it)
The revolvers in .36 and .44 calibre were popular with Confederate troops during the American Civil War and thousands of them were shipped from Birmingham, England to New Orleans under contract to the Griswold Company.

Tranter’s most successful series of arms were his “self-cocking” revolvers, which were initially introduced in 1853. The earliest revolvers utilized Robert Adams’ patent for a solid, one-piece frame and barrel that were machined from a single forging. Tranter’s initial production run of revolvers included both Adams 1851 Patent lock works, and Tranter's own patented lock works. The original “Tranter” type revolvers, known to collectors as 1st Model Tranter or sometimes “Adams-Tranter” revolvers due to the frame marking, had no provision for a fixed loading lever. The lever swiveled on a stud that projected from the left side of the frame, which had no provision to retain the lever when it was mounted on the revolver. The lever was intended to be stored in a case or carried in the pocket; hardly a practical solution if the user actually had to reload the revolver in the field. Most of these guns were manufactured on Adams Patent frames
Famous Tranter owners

Major Heros Von Borcke, CSA
The Pinkerton Detective Agency
General J.E.B. Stuart, CSA
Capt Charles Green, CSA
Chief Inspector Donald Swanson, Scotland Yard
Sherlock Holmes
Thomas Knowles
Murder of Peter Clark

The frame, under the grip bears a serial number 7 and another matching 7 partially under the spring , and another 7 on the wooden grip. The cylinder rotates sporadically and fires on the second trigger, the left side inverted Y safety spring has a thin arm crack, single nipple lacking. No maker engravings present, with regular view and proof stamps on every cylinder and barrel, both of which are standard features on all Confederate UK contract arms,  read more

Code: 24576

1650.00 GBP

Superb Large Signed Bronze Sculpture by Julius Schmidt Felling Circa 1900's of a Standing Youth

Superb Large Signed Bronze Sculpture by Julius Schmidt Felling Circa 1900's of a Standing Youth

The large bronze statue shows wonderful patination, and this work shows amazing skill and definition.

Likely based on an Ancient Greek Olympian

Julius Paul Schmidt-Felling (1835–1920) was a hugely talented German sculptor who worked during the mid-to-late 19th century and early 20th century. The subject matter of his work was most wide and varied.
He produced, among others, bronze statues of heroic warriors, athletes, blacksmiths, and farmers.

A number of his sculptures of young children were in the Dutch colonial style, some being whimsical in nature.

His oeuvre included a wide array of sculptures, ranging in subject matter that included heroic warriors (often mounted on horseback), athletes, blacksmiths, and farmers. He sculpted a number of pieces featuring young children in primarily the Dutch colonial style. His output included some animal sculpture, too, but in lesser volume compared to other subjects. Some of his better known sculptures are small whimsical models of young boys smoking cigarettes and pipes. Schmidt-Felling was a very versatile sculptor.

The majority of Schmidt-Felling's work was cast in bronze and most pieces can be classified as being within the realism or art nouveau genres. Late in his career, however—during the art deco era—he produced a number of chryselephantine sculptures whereby both ivory and bronze were used together in the casting and construction process.

57 cm high  read more

Code: 24458

2750.00 GBP

A Rare & Huge, M1863 Single Action Starr Army 'Long Barrel' Revolver of the Civil War, .44 Calibre

A Rare & Huge, M1863 Single Action Starr Army 'Long Barrel' Revolver of the Civil War, .44 Calibre

Single action 1863 model. Good external condition for age An impressive, big and powerful .44 cal revolver of the Civil War and early Wild West. Alongside the Colt Dragoon this was the biggest pistol of the Civil War, and it has amazing presence with an 8 inch barrel. Starr was the third largest producer of revolvers for the Union behind Colt and Remington.During the war the M-1863 Starr was issued to a number of US cavalry regiments, including the 1st Colorado Cavalry, the 6th & 7th Michigan Cavalry and the 11th New York Cavalry, just to name a few. While Starr double action revolver production started in 1858 they did not start production of the single action until 1863 finishing in 1865. Total Model 1863 S.A. production was approximately 25,000 revolvers making them rare finds today. The Model 1863 Single Action .44 calibre percussion Army Revolver was the third of the Starr revolvers produced for the military. Between September, 1863 and December 22, 1864, the Starr Arms Company delivered 25,002 Model 1863 Army revolvers to the Ordnance Department. The government's cost for this arm was $12.00 each. These arms and components were produced in Starr's plants in Yonkers, Binghamton and Moorisania. The grips on this gun are very good. The big long barrel Starr Army Revolver is the pistol that was chosen by the hero in Clint Eastwood's Academy Award winning movie 'The Unforgiven' played by Clint Eastwood, and the pistol was in fact featured as the main promotional part of the film in the 'Unforgiven' poster, see picture of the Starr Revolver, in the poster, in our gallery copyright Warner Bros.Single-action Army model of 1863 in .44 chambering with production numbers reaching 3,000, 21,454 and 23,000 respectively.
Design of the pistol fell to Ebanezar (Eban) Townsend Starr and all of the guns were manufactured out of the Starr Arms Company facility of Binghampton and Yonkers, New York for Federal service. The guns relied on a percussion cap system of operation with each chamber of the six-round cylinder loaded with a charge and a ball. Percussion caps were set upon the awaiting nipples found at each chamber. The hammer then fell on these caps to produce the needed ignition of the propellant charge within each chamber, the resultant forces propelling the ball out of the barrel. Externally, the revolver was of a conventional design arrangement. The handle was ergonomically curved for a good fit in the hand while being covered in useful grips. A solid frame was featured around the rotating six-shot cylinder which offered strength that open-frame revolvers of the period generally lacked. The hammer protruded from the rear of the frame within reach of the shooting hand's thumb for actuation as necessary. A loading arm was positioned under the barrel to help ram the contents of the chambers to the rear (and thus closer to the percussion cap's port). The barrel sat over this arm in the usual way, the ball projectiles guided into it by way of a proper seal from the cylinder's front face to the barrel's rear end. All in all, a traditional revolver arrangement that was proven to work. Sighting was by way of iron fittings over the top of the gun.

The gun has been made none actionable by the removal of the mainspring and cylinder ratchet pawl {no longer present} possibly as a simple way to temporarily deactivate its use. All the missing parts are relatively easy to sourced in America, for a few hundred dollars, but its next owner may not wish to even bother as it is no longer to be used, However, the price very much reflects the fact of the lacking of the small internal action parts, which makes this revolver incredibly inexpensive. Our last complete one we sold for £2850


As with all our antique guns no licence is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables.  read more

Code: 25258

1750.00 GBP

A Very Good 5 Shot Revolver of The United States Civil War, By E.Whitney of New Haven Connecticut

A Very Good 5 Shot Revolver of The United States Civil War, By E.Whitney of New Haven Connecticut

A scarce American Civil War era 5 shot Percussion revolver made by E. Whitney. Circa 1860. The 6 inch barrel marked on top E. WHITNEY N. HAVEN. Two piece walnut grips and brass trigger guard. With nice overall aged patination, serial numbered under the grip 26941. Good tight spring action and rotation of the cylinder.

Eli Whitney Sr. established his Whitneyville Armory in 1798 and produced firearms (among other things) by contract for the United states government. Just prior to this in 1793, Whitney invented the mechanical cotton gin, which dramatically changed the economic landscape in the United States, namely in the South. His labour saving device made the processing of harvested cotton extremely efficient and requiring fewer labourer's. This machine caused the market for cotton to explode and more labourer's were needed to plant, grow and harvest the crop. This resulted in a corresponding boom in the Southern slave trade. Great fortunes were created, and the population of the South became such that one in three Southerners were slaves. All this provided the fuel that would become the American Civil War. Eli Whitney died in 1825, and his son, Eli Whitney Jr began running the family business in 1841. In 1847 Whitney Jr. began to manufacture 1,000 of Samuel Colt’s latest revolver the Colt Walker revolver. Production of this revolver helped both parties immensely as it kept Colt in business and it allowed Whitney Jr. to gain experience making revolvers. With the expiration of Colt’s patents in 1857, Whitney began production of percussion revolvers based on Colt’s patents, some of them very closely copied. The Whitney Revolver were produced at the Whitneyville Armory manufacturing centre in the Whitneyville section of New Haven, Connecticut from the late 1850's through to the early 1860's. Many of these were purchased by individual soldiers for use when they were going off to the American Civil War. Overall length 11 inches. In good overall condition, showing commensurate signs of use and wear. A super Civil War era percussion revolver.  read more

Code: 25256

1750.00 GBP

A Superb Quality, Antique, Victorian, Silver Topped Hidden, Secret, Dagger-Cane. In Fine Malacca Wood. In Fabulous Condition

A Superb Quality, Antique, Victorian, Silver Topped Hidden, Secret, Dagger-Cane. In Fine Malacca Wood. In Fabulous Condition

The top is silver, finely engraved with a Sumatran elephant in a palm tree jungle. With a snug friction release, the dagger is thus extracted by means of the drawing the hidden dagger from the Malacca haft. Malacca wood is taken from one species of rattan palm native to the coast of Sumatra. With long, slender stems it was considered perfect for making walking sticks and canes. It is very lightweight and strong with a satin-like bark that has a natural gloss. The colour varies from blond through reddish amber to brown. The blade is of two stage form of double edged form on great strength and substance.

This is a cane intended for close quarter action. The sword stick or cane was in its day ideal for defensive action, but the dagger-cane was usually intended for both offensive or defensive, ideal for use in a crowd or a hand to hand conflict in most confined quarters of any bustling city. As an antique collectable it is simply awesome. A startling and most collectable conversation piece, worthy of the legendary Sherlock Holmes himself, in fact, more likely a tool of the diabolical genius, and arch nemeses of Holmes, Professor Moriarty . One can only imagine what perils and heinous adversities that it's original owner, who had this awesome cane commissioned, must have feared, dreaded or even instigated. The name Bartitsu might well have been completely forgotten if not for a chance mention by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in one of his Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. In the Adventure of the Empty House (1903), Holmes explained that he had escaped the clutches of his enemy Professor Moriarty through his knowledge of bartitsu, or Japanese wrestling. Using a walking cane with or without hidden blade.

The swordstick was a popular fashion accessory for the wealthy during the 18th and 19th centuries. While the weapon's origins are unknown, it is apparent that the cane-sword's popularity peaked when decorative swords were steadily being replaced by canes as a result of the rising popularity of firearms, and the lessening influence of swords and other small arms.


The first sword canes were made for nobility by leading sword cutlers. Sixteenth century sword canes were often bequeathed in wills. Sword canes became more popular as the streets became less safe. Society dictated it mandatory that gentlemen of the 18th and especially 19th centuries would wear a cane when out and about, and it was common for the well-dressed gentleman to own and sport canes in a variety of styles, including a good and sound sword cane. Although Byron was proficient in the use of pistols, his lameness and his need to defend himself in some potentially dangerous situations made a swordstick doubly useful to him. He received lessons in London from the fencing master Henry Angelo and owned a number of swordsticks, some of which were supplied by his boxing instructor Gentleman John Jackson.

Sword sticks came in all qualities, and for numerous purposes, from the simplest bamboo sword cane personal defender to stout customs officer’s ‘prod’, to offensive close quarter stiletto dagger canes and even to the other side of the world in the form of Japanese samurai’s shikome-sue, hidden swords.

We show two famous sword sticks in the gallery, one that belonged to Lord Byron, and another in a Presidential Centre Library collection, a historic sword stick is part of the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Centre Library collection in Fremont, Ohio from the Waggoner family, the sword-cane was said to have been presented to Mr Waggoner by General George Washington in honour of Waggoner's service in Washington's Life Guard during the American Revolutionary War

37 inches long overall 9.75 inches long blade. An original antique collectable for display purposes only.  read more

Code: 25255

1195.00 GBP

1780 Pattern, French Pistolet Maritime, An Officer's Naval 'Sea Service' Belt Pistol. Used By A French Naval Officer From the Battle of the Nile through to Battle of Trafalgar Era

1780 Pattern, French Pistolet Maritime, An Officer's Naval 'Sea Service' Belt Pistol. Used By A French Naval Officer From the Battle of the Nile through to Battle of Trafalgar Era

Very probably by Grosselin a Charleville.

Steel barrel, walnut half stock, steel bird's head butt and steel furniture. Flintlock action with pierced heart shaped cock.

French sea service pistols are far more rare than their British equivalents, especially the slightly smaller officer's versions, due to the fact there were fewer French ships, and that so many French ships-of-the-line being captured or sunk by the British Royal Navy, between the 1790's to 1805 Such as when the French Fleet was soundly thrashed in the Egypt campaign at the Nile in 1798, and a little later the French and Spanish fleet, in 1805, were once again soundly thrashed and captured by Admiral Nelson at Cape Trafalgar.

The Battle of the Nile, was a battle that was one of the greatest victories of the British admiral Horatio Nelson. It was fought on August 1, 1798, between the British and French fleets in Abū Qīr Bay, near Alexandria, Egypt.

The French Revolutionary general Napoleon Bonaparte in 1798 made planned for an invasion of Egypt in order to constrict Britain’s trade routes and threaten its possession of India. The British government heard that a large French naval expedition was to sail from a French Mediterranean port under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte

Determined to find the French fleet, he sailed to Egypt once more, and on August 1 1798 he sighted the main French fleet of 13 ships of the line and 4 frigates under Admiral François-Paul Brueys d’Aigailliers at anchor in Abū Qīr Bay.

Although there were but a few hours left until nightfall and Brueys’s ships were in a strong defensive position, being securely ranged in a sandy bay that was flanked on one side by a shore battery on Abū Qīr Island, Nelson gave orders to attack at once. Several of the British warships were able to maneuver around the head of the French line of battle and thus got inside and behind their position. Fierce fighting ensued, during which Nelson himself was wounded in the head. The climax came at about 10:00 PM, when Brueys’s 120-gun flagship, L’Orient, which was by far the largest ship in the bay, blew up with most of the ship’s company, including the admiral. The fighting continued for the rest of the night; just two of Brueys’s ships of the line and a pair of French frigates escaped destruction or capture by the British. The British suffered about 900 casualties, the French about 9,000.

The Battle of the Nile had several important effects. It isolated Napoleon’s army in Egypt, thus ensuring its ultimate disintegration. It ensured that in due time Malta would be retaken from the French, and it both heightened British prestige and secured British control of the Mediterranean.

The Battle of Trafalgar, (October 21, 1805), was a naval engagement of the Napoleonic Wars, which established British naval supremacy for more than 100 years; it was fought west of Cape Trafalgar, Spain, between Cádiz and the Strait of Gibraltar. A fleet of 33 ships (18 French and 15 Spanish) under Admiral Pierre de Villeneuve fought a British fleet of 27 ships under Admiral Horatio Nelson.

Nelson was outnumbered, with 27 British ships of the line to 33 allied ships including the largest warship in either fleet, the Spanish Santísima Trinidad. To address this imbalance, Nelson sailed his fleet directly at the allied battle line's flank, hoping to break the line into pieces. Villeneuve had worried that Nelson might attempt this tactic but, for various reasons, had made no plans for this eventuality. The plan worked almost perfectly; Nelson's columns split the Franco-Spanish fleet in three, isolating the rear half from Villeneuve's flag aboard Bucentaure. The allied vanguard sailed off while it attempted to turn around, giving the British temporary superiority over the remainder of their fleet. In the ensuing fierce battle 20 allied ships were lost, while the British lost none.

Nelson's own HMS Victory led the front column and was almost knocked out of action. Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during the battle, and died shortly before it ended. Villeneuve was captured along with his flagship Bucentaure. He attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. The senior Spanish fleet officer, Admiral Federico Gravina, escaped with the remnant of the Franco-Spanish fleet (a third of the original number of ships); he died five months later of wounds sustained during the battle.

The victory confirmed the naval supremacy Britain had established during the course of the eighteenth century, and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy.

At the same time this pistol was made there was another version, same form and size, called the 1779 pattern so called 'sea-dog's head' pistol, however, it had instead of the steel bird's head butt that this has, it had a carved dog's head.

A photo in the gallery from around 35 years ago of an article about these very form of pistols by Grosselin of Charleville, an identical pair, yet also, one of them, like this one was un-named.

The condition is jolly good, excellent tight spring and action. Rammer lacking  read more

Code: 25253

1800.00 GBP

A Most Scarce US Civil War Period Remington Beals' Patent Model 1858 Navy Percussion Six-Shot Revolver, .36 calibre

A Most Scarce US Civil War Period Remington Beals' Patent Model 1858 Navy Percussion Six-Shot Revolver, .36 calibre

Manufactured between 1861 and 1863, approximately 14,500 Remington-Beals Navy revolvers were produced. About 500 martially-marked examples of this model were purchased by the U.S. Army, and an additional 1,000 were bought by the Navy. In 1875, the Navy returned about 1,000 various model Remington .36 calibre revolvers, including the Beals Navy, for factory conversion to accept the .38 calibre centre fire metallic cased cartridge. Sn 10402. Sold with an old but later tooled leather holster, that is complimentary, and free.

The business expanded through the 1850s, and handgun production began in 1857 with the introduction of the Remington-Beals pocket revolver.

The coming of the Civil War naturally brought about a dramatic increase in the demand for firearms, and Remington's production also increased to keep pace. During this period, the company manufactured both .36 and .44 calibre revolvers, as well as Model 1863 Percussion Contract Rifle, popularly known as the "Zouave" rifle.

Beals’ 1858 patent (21,478) was granted on September 14th of that year and covered the winged cylinder arbor pin that secured the cylinder to the frame, which was retained by the loading lever located under the barrel and could be withdrawn from the frame only when the lever was lowered. Thus, began the evolution of the second most used US marital revolver of the American Civil War. The first guns were produced in .36 caliber and production started to roll off the assembly line during late 1860 or early 1861. The .36 calibre “Navy” revolver was followed by a .44 calibre “Army” variant soon thereafter. By the time Beals pattern revolver production ended in 1862, some 15,000 of the “Navy” sized handguns had been produced, while only about 2,000 of the larger “Army” revolvers were manufactured. The subsequent model was the William Elliott “improved” Model 1861 pattern Remington revolvers, also known to collectors as the “Old Model” Remingtons, started to replace the Beals models by the middle of 1862.



The Beals Navy Revolver was Remington’s first large frame, martial handgun to make it into production, with the Beals Army following fairly quickly on its heels. While an experimental Beals “Army” had been produced earlier, which was really just a scaled-up version of the Beals pocket model, it was only produced as a prototype and it is believed that less than ten were manufactured.

The US government had been relatively pleased with the original Beals Navy design and had obtained some 11,249 of the 15,000 Beals Navy revolvers produced. The purchases had been a combination of direct contract with Remington combined with open market purchases of some 7,250 revolvers that would not pass through a government inspection process. The initial success of the 1,600 Beals Navy revolvers contracted for in 1861 lead to an Ordnance Department contract on June 13 of 1862 for 5,000 additional “Navy” caliber revolvers to Remington.

Good tight spring and action, nice natural aged patina overall blue to hammer, the cylinder rotation a little hesitant due age.  read more

Code: 25254

2950.00 GBP