580 items found
Another Piece of Amazing History. An Original Waterloo Recovered Sword, From Such as  La Haye Sainte or Hougemont Region Super British Infantry Officer's Spadroon Sword

Another Piece of Amazing History. An Original Waterloo Recovered Sword, From Such as La Haye Sainte or Hougemont Region Super British Infantry Officer's Spadroon Sword

A great historical sword, actually used and recovered from the Battle of Waterloo after being concealed in undergrowth since 1815. Thus, its iron surface is completely russetted throughout, but the blade still retains its combat temper and flexibility as a mint condition surviving sword might. The hilt grip is carved reeded ebony, and in superb condition, as good as a perfect sword would likely still have today.
We have just recently acquired two English officer's spadroon swords from Waterloo, one with a silver grip, in fabulous condition, that was recovered just a few days after the battle, and then placed in the Waterloo museum, and this one, that was obviuosly recovered much later, and its surface has pitted accordingly. However, both are just as interesting as each other, historically speaking.

From the Cotton Collection, in the Hotel du Musee, at Waterloo, of swords recovered and used at the Battle of Waterloo.

The spadroon infantry officers was the style of sword that first appeared and evolved from the 1780's onwards, this is likely from the 1790's, thus it would indicate its use by a seasoned officer, and not a latterly commissioned officer, possibly this sword was used by an officer of higher rank due to his likely length of service, that would have been approaching 20 years.

The blade is maker marked, by reknown German emigre English sword retailer, J. J. Runkel. He is well renown as probably a good percentage of his imported Solingen blades were fitted to British officer's swords during the whole of the Napoleonic era. In fact he was also notorious, and of nefarious character, as he was jailed at least twice, and heavily fined, for importing unlisted quantities of blades from Solingen, and avoiding importing duty. So, he was a most famous weapons merchant of note during the wars with Napoleon, both in his day, and indeed today.

La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby), is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.
La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

It would look super simply wall hung, as usual for a sword of this type, or a nice cased frame could look very good indeed. With an engraved historical detailed plaque.


The Cotton Collection, the full weapons, militaria, and recovered artifact display, from the battlefield, housed at the Hotel du Musee at Waterloo, owned first by Edward Cotton, then by his descendant family, was sold by auction in 1909.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite armoury and gallery.

It has only one small hilt langet still present. No scabbard  read more

Code: 25059

495.00 GBP

Archived

A Superb Battle of Waterloo Artifact Recovered from the Battle Site, An Officer's Copper Gilt, Pinchbeck, ' Shot-Through' Pocket Watch

A Superb Battle of Waterloo Artifact Recovered from the Battle Site, An Officer's Copper Gilt, Pinchbeck, ' Shot-Through' Pocket Watch

From its misshapen rim, that is very strong indeed, one can deduce it was likely shot through by a musket ball, thus tearing out the face, dial, mechanism, and back plate. This would not be damage caused by simply dropping or even treading upon it. It is also assumed to be formerly the property of an officer, as a pocket watch would have been a most expensive luxury at the time.

It would look amazing framed. There is no doubt the interest in shot-through relics, is incredible, especially from famous battles. They have incredible desirability for collectors of historical pieces, and great conversational value as well. The carabiniers breastplate, shot through by a cannon ball at Waterloo, is one of the best and most famous in the world. It is housed on display in Les Invalides in Paris, and considered to be literally priceless. Speculation about the fate of the carabinier would of course be pointless, but one can presume the watch's officer owner, may possibly have survived, although more likely, not.

At the time it was shot through it would have glistened like gold, as it was made of pinchbeck metal, a very strong Georgian period jeweller's metal made from an amalgam of zinc with copper, but it has now gained a green patina after being long buried in the ground.

This extraordinary Waterloo battle relic was already old when it was lost at Waterloo, probably a family heirloom, and then discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).

It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite, armoury and gallery.

In the 1700s, a London clock maker, Christopher Pinchbeck invented an alloy of zinc (17 per cent) and copper (83 per cent), ie a type of brass, which he sold as imitation gold or 'pinchbeck metal'.  read more

Code: 25031

290.00 GBP

Archived

A Bronze Pipe Tobacco Tamper of a Waterloo Combatant, Recovered From at La Haye Sainte. In The form Of a Cannoneers Block and Tackle

A Bronze Pipe Tobacco Tamper of a Waterloo Combatant, Recovered From at La Haye Sainte. In The form Of a Cannoneers Block and Tackle

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback and some other relic items of combat, such as soldiers thimbles, plus grenades, cannon balls etc. discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).
It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.
La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.


In the nineteenth century things started to speed up for pipe smokers. General Lassalle declared that “a hussar that does not smoke is a bad soldier!”. Following the advice of his General, Napoleon arranged for the creation of a tobacco pipe that would be specifically designed for soldiers in combat.

Photo in the gallery of a French Wellington satirical pipe bowl, also recovered from Waterloo, now in Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington's former home.

This is the clay head of a French pipe, found on the battlefield of Waterloo. The front of the pipe is an unflattering caricature of the Duke of Wellington, with a bowl in his cockaded hat to hold the burning tobacco. The stem of the pipe is carved into a depiction of a French soldier, disrespectfully thumbing his nose at the Duke – perhaps this is the face of the Frenchman who made this mocking piece of personal propaganda.

At the time of the Napoleonic Wars, political satire and caricatures of political and military leaders became extremely popular across Europe – often showing the elite in ridiculous situations, full of insulting or sexual references. In a time of wars and revolutions, these depictions gave ordinary soldiers and civilians a way of understanding the world and expressing their voices. Buying or making political items like this pipe gave ordinary people the feeling that they were taking a side in these momentous events.

Wellington’s craggy features and large nose are particularly exaggerated, mimicking his popular nickname of “Nosey”. The soldier’s thumbing his nose behind Wellington’s back is a traditional gesture of disrespect, known at the time as “cocking a snook” at someone.

At the time of the Battle of Waterloo, Wellington was the most famous soldier in the British Army, having fought a long and successful campaign against the French in the Spanish Peninsular. He was less well-known in France, but was still notorious enough to be the target of satire and derision, from all quarters of society. Napoleon, who had never faced the Duke of Wellington in battle before Waterloo, was inclined to insult his adversary – possibly in order to inspire confidence among the French commanders. Napoleon called Wellington “the sepoy general”, referring to the latter’s service in India, and supposedly declared that beating the Allies would be “as easy as eating breakfast” on the morning of the Battle of Waterloo.

This pipe would have had a longer wooden stem, which has rotted away. Smoking tobacco was extremely popular among soldiers, for comfort, warmth and to suppress hunger. The health risks of tobacco were not yet understood, and smoking was thought to be good for the nervous system and strengthening to the lungs. One British Captain, Robert Percival, claimed that his men stayed healthy “by drinking strong arrack alcohol and smoking tobacco.”  read more

Code: 25046

140.00 GBP

Archived

French 55mm Round Shot Recovered From La Haye Sainte Waterloo

French 55mm Round Shot Recovered From La Haye Sainte Waterloo

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback and some other relic items of combat, such as soldiers thimbles, plus grenades, cannon balls etc. discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby).
It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.
La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.



Photo in the gallery of a range of 2" and smaller {Biscayen} French round shot recovered at Gemioncourt Farm that was located at Quatre Bras and was the scene of fighting between the Dutch and French in the battle which preceded Waterloo.

Biscayan bullets, are very large round shot used in very large calibre blunderbuss type guns used by the French at Waterloo and Quatre-Bras.  read more

Code: 25045

145.00 GBP

Archived

A Rare King George IIIrd Grenade Recovered From The Field of The Battle at Waterloo ...

A Rare King George IIIrd Grenade Recovered From The Field of The Battle at Waterloo ...

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback and some relic items of combat, soldiers thimbles plus grenades, cannon balls etc. discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby). We acquired 3 from Waterloo, this is the last one, the first sold, the second is on reserve. We may never get any again
It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.

The grenade is spherical and made of cast iron. The first grenades were small iron spheres filled with gunpowder fused with a length of slow-match. These types of grenades weighed around 1.5 kg and were equivalent in size to a four-pound cannonball (Crowdy 2015). These types of hand grenades were used during land combat and on Naval vessels. One of the more common munitions aboard warships during the late 18th century and early 19th century was the hand grenade, used for close quarter action. Examples were recovered from HMS Pomone that also had their original fuse in place (Henry 2004). Hand grenades of this kind were used during the Napoleonic era (1799−1815) and were used by both the French and British.

Grenadiers were a specific type of soldier during the late 18th century to the early 19th century, in the earliest days they were tasked with throwing grenades during combat. They had to be at the forefront of the fight to light the fuse and throw at the appropriate moment to minimize the opportunity for the enemy to throw the grenade back. They were selected for being strong, tall and skilled enough to throw them far enough away so as not to harm themselves or their comrades. Such skills led to grenadiers being regarded as an elite fighting force and they were easily identified by their head-gear from ordinary musketeers. The uniform included a belt tube that held the match for lighting the fuse, a feature that was retained in later grenadier uniforms.

Peter Goodwin, a Historical Maritime Consultant and previous curator of HMS Victory confirmed that based on its size, the photographed with size scale grenade, is certainly a hand grenade dating to the Napoleonic era. From an article in Wessex Archaology.

Photo in the gallery {from the above article} of a recovered Napoleonic Wars grenade, almost identical to ours, but still with its fuse plug intact that was recovered from HMS Pomone, as detailed above by Peter Goodwin, but shown by us to show exactly how this grenade would have looked before it was thrown, but failed to detonate, hence it survived intact to be recovered from La Haye Sainte, but now deeply pitted, and empty, with a two inch long thin surface crack but still very sound.

References

Crowdy, T. 2015 Napoleon's Infantry Handbook. Barnsley, Pen and Sword

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite, armoury and gallery.

Last photo in the gallery of two English hollow cast cannon balls found at and from Quatre-Bras, in the Relics of Waterloo book, plus some Biscayan bullets,very large round shot used in very large calibre blunderbuss type guns used by the French at Waterloo and Quatre-Bras.

We have a hollow cast cannon ball to add to the site from a find at Waterloo and a Biscayan round shot  read more

Code: 25043

395.00 GBP

Archived

A King George IIIrd Grenade Recovered From The Field of Battle at Waterloo ...

A King George IIIrd Grenade Recovered From The Field of Battle at Waterloo ...

Recovered alongside the farm’s cast iron fireback and some relic items of combat plus grenades, cannon balls etc. discovered around La Haye Sainte (named either after Jesus Christ's crown of thorns or a bramble hedge round a field nearby). We acquired 3, the first we sold and once they are all sold there will likely be no others to be found.

It is a walled farmhouse compound at the foot of an escarpment on the Charleroi-Brussels road in Belgium. It has changed very little since it played a crucial part in the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

La Haye Sainte was defended by about 400 King's German Legion troops during the Battle of Waterloo. They were hopelessly outnumbered by attacking French troops but held out until the late afternoon when they retired because their ammunition had run out. If Napoleon Bonaparte's army had captured La Haye Sainte earlier in the day, almost certainly he would have broken through the allied centre and defeated the Duke of Wellington's army.

The capture of La Haye Sainte in the early evening then gave the French the advantage of a defensible position from which to launch a potentially decisive attack on the Allied centre. However, Napoleon was too late—by this time, Blücher and the Prussian army had arrived on the battlefield and the outnumbered French army was defeated.

Strategic importance

A view of the battlefield from the Lion's mound. On the top right are the buildings of La Haye Sainte. This view looks east, with Allied forces behind the road to the left (north) and French forces out of shot to the right(south)
The road leads from La Belle Alliance, where Napoleon had his headquarters on the morning of the battle, through where the centre of the French front line was located, to a crossroads on the ridge which is at the top of the escarpment and then on to Brussels. The Duke of Wellington placed the majority of his forces on either side of the Brussels road behind the ridge on the Brussels side. This kept most of his forces out of sight of the French artillery.

During the night from the 17th to the 18th, the main door to the courtyard of the farm was used as firewood by the occupying troops. Therefore, when the King's German Legion (KGL) was stationed in the farm at the morning of the battle they had to hastily fortify La Haye Sainte.

The troops were the 2nd Light Battalion KGL commanded by Major Georg Baring, and part of the 1st Light Battalion KGL. During the battle, they were supported by the 1/2 Nassau Regiment and the light company of the 5th Line Battalion KGL. The majority of these troops were armed with the Baker rifle with grooved barrels, as opposed to the normal Brown Bess musket of the British Army. The French troops also used muskets which were quicker to load than the Baker rifle but the latter was more accurate and had about twice the range of a musket.

Both Napoleon and Wellington made crucial mistakes about La Haye Sainte as it was fought over and around during most of the day. Napoleon failed to allocate enough forces to take the farm earlier in the day while Wellington only realised the strategic value of the position when it was almost too late.

The grenade is spherical and made of cast iron. The first grenades were small iron spheres filled with gunpowder fused with a length of slow-match. These types of grenades weighed around 1.5 kg and were equivalent in size to a four-pound cannonball (Crowdy 2015). These types of hand grenades were used during land combat and on Naval vessels. One of the more common munitions aboard warships during the late 18th century and early 19th century was the hand grenade, used for close quarter action. Examples were recovered from HMS Pomone that also had their original fuse in place (Henry 2004). Hand grenades of this kind were used during the Napoleonic era (1799−1815) and were used by both the French and British.

Grenadiers were a specific type of soldier during the late 18th century to the early 19th century, in the earliest days they were tasked with throwing grenades during combat. They had to be at the forefront of the fight to light the fuse and throw at the appropriate moment to minimize the opportunity for the enemy to throw the grenade back. They were selected for being strong, tall and skilled enough to throw them far enough away so as not to harm themselves or their comrades. Such skills led to grenadiers being regarded as an elite fighting force and they were easily identified by their head-gear from ordinary musketeers. The uniform included a belt tube that held the match for lighting the fuse, a feature that was retained in later grenadier uniforms.

Peter Goodwin, a Historical Maritime Consultant and previous curator of HMS Victory confirmed that based on its size, this is certainly a hand grenade dating to the Napoleonic era. From an article in Wessex Archaology.

Photo in the gallery {from the above article} of a recovered Napoleonic Wars grenade still with its fuse plug intact recovered from HMS Pomone, but shown to show exactly how this grenade would have looked before it was thrown, but failed to detonate, hence it survived intact to be recovered from La Haye Sainte, but now deeply pitted but sound.

As with all our items, every piece will be accompanied by our fully detailed Certificate of Authenticity

References

Crowdy, T. 2015 Napoleon's Infantry Handbook. Barnsley, Pen and Sword

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite, armoury and gallery  read more

Code: 25016

395.00 GBP

Archived

WALLNER, Peter. By Order of the Gestapo : A Record of Life in Dachau and Buchenwald Concentration Camps. Translated from the German by Lawrence Wolfe

WALLNER, Peter. By Order of the Gestapo : A Record of Life in Dachau and Buchenwald Concentration Camps. Translated from the German by Lawrence Wolfe

A rarely seen book, the same issue as the example in the Imperial war Museum. A first hand perspective of life in the pre-war German concentration camps

Title: By Order of the Gestapo: A Record of Life in...
Publisher: London: John Murray
Publication Date: 1941
Binding: Hardcover
Condition: Good with foxing
Dust Jacket Condition: Worn and damaged but present

WALLNER, Peter. By Order of the Gestapo : A Record of Life in Dachau and Buchenwald Concentration Camps. Translated from the German by Lawrence Wolfe.With a Foreword by Lord Davies. London : John Murray, (1941). First Edition. Pp (4),5-279,(1). orange cloth, black lettering to spine. Contents : Foreword. Author's Preface. Introduction. Part I - Dachau. 1. A Hell on Wheels: Journey to Dachau. 2. First Days in Dachau. 3. Lau-Out and Organization of Dachau. 4. The Daily Routine. 5. Existence in the Barrack. 6. The Barrack Officers. 7. Food - The Canteen. 8. "Camp Punishments." 9. The Outside Gangs. 10. Sickness. 11. I Join the Sick Gang. 12. Back in an Outside Gang - Transfer. Part II - Buchenwald. 1. Journey to Buchenwald. 2. First Impressions. 3. Description of Buchenwald Camp. 4. Roll-Calls and Other Tortures. 5. Existence in the Barracks. 6. The Barrack Officers. 7. The Mail. 8. Work. 9. The "November Jews." 10. Working in an Outside Gang. 11. My Winter Wardrobe. 12. Ordeal by Frost and an Execution. 13. Starvation. 14. Sickness. 15. Business in Buchenwald. 16. Light Work. 17. My Release.  read more

Code: 25040

110.00 GBP

Archived

English Translation of Mein Kampf by A. Hitler, My Struggle. Published by Hurst and Blackett. 1938, The Year Hitler Was Named Time Magazine's

English Translation of Mein Kampf by A. Hitler, My Struggle. Published by Hurst and Blackett. 1938, The Year Hitler Was Named Time Magazine's "Man of the Year"

December 1938. published in London by Hurst and Blackett. With author's photograph and publication signature, and a further publication signature to the Author's Forward.

Very good condition for age, usual yellowing to pages.

Hurst and Blackett, in October 1933, just nine months after Hitler rose to power in Germany, started to publish, in English, Hitler's infamous biographical book, Mein Kampf. Probably the most famous biography in publishing history.

Hitler began dictation of the book while imprisoned for what he considered to be "political crimes" following his failed Putsch in Munich in November 1923. Although Hitler received many visitors initially, he soon devoted himself entirely to the book. As he continued, Hitler realised that it would have to be a two-volume work, with the first volume scheduled for release in early 1925. The governor of Landsberg noted at the time that "he hopes the book will run into many editions, thus enabling him to fulfil his financial obligations and to defray the expenses incurred at the time of his trial."

Hitler originally published his book in German in 1925. There was a little if any interest in Mein Kampf outside the country as he was an unknown Bavarian fringe candidate. When he unexpectedly vaulted to power in January 1933, European publishers rushed to obtain the contract to translate his work and publish it in other countries. Because the German Mein Kampf was so telling about the coming war and atrocities he would inflict on the French, the Soviet, and most of all the Jewish people, Adolf Hitler was hesitant to allow any translations or publishing rights in different countries. As most of you know, Hitler fought bravely during the entire four years of the Great War and he was wounded twice. During that time, as he later recounts in Mein Kampf, Hitler became convinced the French rather than the British were his true western enemies. In fact during the first three years of his chancellorship, Hitler tried repeatedly to secure a military alliance with England so they could help him destroy France, or at least stand by while Hitler obtained his sweet revenge for Germany's humiliation at the Versailles peace table. So the newly-appointed German leader authorised Mein Kampf to be translated into English and published by London's Hurst and Blackett in the spring of 1933. However, Hitler never allowed a complete translation. After an Englishman named Edgar Dugdale completed his work on the actual translation, the Nazis insisted on revising and censoring the 700 page book. Hitler employed Nazi party official Dr. Hans Thost to specifically go through and remove offending passages in Mein Kampf and to also surgically alter his original German words to make a direct appeal for his British alliance. Dr. Thost was the sole Nazi party official living in London at this time. He spent the summer of 1933 altering and removing over 400 pages from this new English translation and when he was finished, he finally allowed Hurst and Blackett to take this edition to print that September. Even though Hitler was now the leader of Germany, the British publishing house Hurst and Blackett was hesitant about printing too many copies of this book initially. 1933 was the height of the Great Depression, and books were only for the few. It wasn't until 1937 that Hurst and Blackett started cranking out a cheaper, smaller My Struggle because Europeans started to become nervous as Hitler was clearly rearming and reindustrializing Germany. Most copies were purchased by British intellectuals or those keenly interested in foreign policy. Most of those people lived in London, and quite a few of the copies of this book were destroyed in the Blitz. Indeed the Hurst and Blackett Publishing house was completely destroyed by German bombs in 1940.

The book was edited by the former Hieronymite friar, catholic priest and journalist, Bernhard Stempfle, who later died during the Night of the Long Knives.

The book was so successful around the world Hitler used the proceeds to fund his entire election campaign, tours and lectures. And due to its and the authors success he was named Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" in 1938

The first 1933 Hurst and Blackett English edition can now achieve values up to £6,500  read more

Code: 25039

240.00 GBP

Archived

A Scarce WW1 British Propaganda 1813 Iron Cross. Stamped R.D, to Front.

A Scarce WW1 British Propaganda 1813 Iron Cross. Stamped R.D, to Front.

Sold in WW1 in Britain as a propaganda tool to mock the award for so called gallantry, when they were awarded to German soldiers as rewards for the barbaric invasions of French and Belgian towns, that were decried as scenes of butchery and depravity against the local inhabitants. Germany invaded neutral Belgium on 4 August 1914. From the next day, civilians were executed en masse, as the invasion force advanced on its first obstacle, the ring of forts around Liège. To retaliate for the shelling from these forts, the German troops rounded up inhabitants of surrounding villages. Victims were selected and shot, those still alive being killed off with bayonets. By 8 August, nearly 850 civilians were dead. By then, several of the dynamics of this particular type of violence had fully emerged. First, the massacres occurred where the invading army suffered setbacks; the German military did not consider Belgium’s military defence to be legitimate. Second, the victims were accused, incorrectly, of being franc-tireurs (civilian snipers). Most of the German rank and file genuinely believed that the locals were attacking them; this sniper delusion was sometimes countered by the commanding officers, sometimes not. Third, there were women, children and old men among the victims but the vast majority were men of military age. These were more likely to be suspected of sniping; moreover, the invading troops resented them for still enjoying the civilian life that they themselves had so recently been torn from. Fourth, and last, the massacres went together with rituals designed to show civilians how helpless they were. People were made to cheer the troops; local dignitaries (mayors, priests) were publicly mistreated, in some cases killed. On a smaller scale, invaded France saw similar killings: the first civilians were shot in the northern Meuse-et Moselle on 9 August, and, among other massacres, 60 people were killed in Gerbéviller, a large lorrain village, on 24 August. Throughout, the invaders made a point of stressing their superiority. One makeshift triumphal arch in the small town of Werchter, north of Louvain, built close to where the victims of a group execution lay buried, bore the inscription ‘To The Victorious Warriors’. As the French say, "plus ca change plus ca mem chose"  read more

Code: 24236

110.00 GBP

Archived

A 1790 Pattern French Grenadier's or Voltiguer's Sabre,Recovered From The Battlesite And Used at Waterloo

A 1790 Pattern French Grenadier's or Voltiguer's Sabre,Recovered From The Battlesite And Used at Waterloo

From the Cotton Collection, in the Hotel du Musee, at Waterloo, of swords recovered and used at the Battle of Waterloo.
It is a model 1790 grenadier sabre, a simplified version of the model 1767. In fact, the handle - guard assembly is in a single block for greater strength and faster manufacturing. The 1767 sabre has an assembled hilt and guard. The blades are the same.
The 1790 retains the enormous riveting button of its ancestor, but has lost the earpieces at the bottom of the handle.
The 1790 sabre was used until the end of the French Empire in 1815, and excavations in the Smolensk region revealed several dating back to the battle of August 1812.

In nice condition for age, in used combat condition, bright blade with some pitting. We have two illustrations of original 24th Voltiguers and 24th Grenadiers painted in 1807 for Major Otto of Baden, that appear on the renown Otto Manuscript. Both of those men are wearing this very pattern of sword.

In 1804, each French Line (Ligne) and Light (Légère) infantry battalion was ordered to create one company of ninety of the best shots who would serve as elite skirmishers. The voltigeurs were skilled at sharpshooting and received specific training in marksmanship, using cover and taking the initiative.

During Napoleon's 1815 return from exile, the Old Guard was reformed,16 and fought at the Battle of Waterloo, where the 2e Regiment de Grenadiers-à-Pied was pivotal in the defense of the village of Plancenoit against the Prussians.1718 The 1er Regiment, charged with protecting the field position around Napoleon himself, served as a rear guard after the failure of the attack of the Middle Guard on the British center.19 The Old Guard cavalry was involved in the unsuccessful midday charges against the British infantry, and was unavailable at the battle's decisive moments.

In August 1815, Louis XVIII ordered the Imperial Guard abolished. By December, all the Old Guard regiments were disbanded. Ex-guardsmen ended up in a variety of places after their units' disbandment. Some re-enlisted into the king's army but most lived out their lives watched with suspicion by Bourbon police. When Napoleon's body was returned to France in 1840, many of the surviving Old Guard paraded in threadbare uniforms.

During the Battle of Waterloo the Voltigeurs, along with the Tirailleurs, conducted a tenacious defense of the town of Plancenoit against a major Prussian flanking attack. Despite being heavily outnumbered, the Young Guard, reinforced by some battalions of Old Guard Grenadiers, held the town until the defeat of the Middle Guard attack on the allied centre caused the army to collapse.

After the abdication of Napoleon and the Second Restoration of the Bourbon kings, the surviving regiments of Voltigeurs, along with the remnants of the entire Imperial Guard, were disbanded.

The Cotton Collection, the full weapons, militaria, and recovered artifact display, from the battlefield, housed at the Hotel du Musee at Waterloo, owned first by Edward Cotton, then by his descendant family, was sold by auction in 1909.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading, as Britain’s oldest established, and favourite armoury and gallery.  read more

Code: 25023

795.00 GBP

Archived