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Great War Period “On War Service 1916”. The Women’s Badge
Serial numbered, maker marked by J.A.Wylie & Co. London. Affixed by a ball head pin. The women’s pattern triangular brooch was finally introduced in May 1916. It was available for women “engaged in the manufacture of munitions of war or other urgent war work”, which included women employed full-time in canteens “etc” of such establishments, skilled and unskilled workers, clerical staff in the approved companies, charladies, and cloakroom attendants. A woman could not be given a badge until she had two months on the job training and badges were not to be issued to girls under 16. No individual certificates were issued with the women’s badges and the employer could control allocation and re-allocation of badges, - they were basically left to their own devices in this respect although the same rules as for the men’s badges applied regarding illegal wearing and handing in when leaving employment or coming off war work. Amongst others, the Chief Inspector at Woolwich Arsenal appeared before the committee and reported that “his” women were keen to be issued with some form of badge, noting that “Apart from sentimental reasons, a badge enables it’s wearer to obtain cheap traveling facilities by rail under certain conditions and secures to it’s wearer preference on crowded trams.” (in other words the conductor would admit a woman who was badged in preference to one who wasn’t). Another point put forward to justify issuing badges was that “it will be useful as a protection to women. They have often to travel distances at night back from their work and an official badge will help secure them from annoyance.”, the MoM diarist earnestly noting here that “Special emphasis was laid on this last point.”

Code: 20497Price: 45.00 GBP


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Original EarIy Italianate Flintlock Holster Pistol As Favoured by Pirates
A most attractive early 18th century pistol, designed to fit in a wide belt sash, or, in a flintlock pistol bucket. A pistol with superb charm and elegant lines. With a silver cartouch on the grip, fully floriate engraved over the lock and a stunningly floriate, Italianate, chisseled and engraved flared barrel. It has fairly plain steel mounts, a brass tipped steel ramrod, and a walnut stock. This is exactly the type of pistol one sees, and in fact expects to see, depicted in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A sprauncy chisseled barrel pistol, with a large, steel butt cap and complete with it's elongated extra long 'ears' [side straps] typical of the period of early gunmaking. It is finely embellished all over deepley chisseled rococco acanthus scrolling. The action is fully operational. This is an original, honest and impressive antique pistol piece that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This Pistol may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. This pistol is essentially a Turko-Ottoman example of the highly attractive type that were efficient, effective, most sought after and much prized, and thus an essential part of the pirate's trade. They didn't conform to a regular pattern, varying in quality, but they all had the 'form follows function' ethos. A style of pistol that first surfaced around 1665, and saw the peak of it's popularity in Western Europe during the mid to third quarter of the 18th century. The design was overtaken, but only in much of Western Europe, by a simpler, plainer form of pistol design, but it continued to be very popular, no doubt due to it's extravagance and style, in middle and eastern Europe, especially around the Mediterranean, until the early 19th century. A good slender curvature, and a medium weight long pistol that suits a comfortable grip. It was written that after Queen Anne's War, which ended in 1713, it cast vast numbers of naval seamen into unemployment and caused a huge slump in wages. Around 40,000 men found themselves without work at the end of the war - roaming the streets of ports like Bristol, Portsmouth and New York. In wartime privateering provided the opportunity for a relative degree of freedom and a chance at wealth. The end of war meant the end of privateering too, and these unemployed ex-privateers only added to the huge labour surplus. Queen Anne's War had lasted 11 years and in 1713 many sailors must have known little else but warfare and the plundering of ships. It was commonly observed that on the cessation of war privateers turned pirate. The combination of thousands of men trained and experienced in the capture and plundering of ships suddenly finding themselves unemployed and having to compete harder and harder for less and less wages was explosive - for many piracy must have been one of the few alternatives to starvation. Euro-American pirate crews really formed one community, with a common set of customs shared across the various ships. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity thrived at sea over a hundred years before the French Revolution, and continued for many years after. The authorities were often shocked by their libertarian tendencies; the Dutch Governor of Mauritius met a pirate crew and commented: "Every man had as much say as the captain and each man carried his own weapons in his blanket". A 18th century pistol of eastern Mediterranean origin, and although it has signs of combat wear is still working highly effectively, and was likely used right into the mid 19th century. It looks most attractive, it is completely original, an antique flintlock of days long gone past yet not forgotten. Overall 16 inches long.

Code: 20496Price: 1375.00 GBP


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A Very Fine Highlanders, Gilt Feather Bonnet or Glengarry Badge
A super quality gilt badge, probably Victorian and bearing some of the form of the Black Watch, with St Andrew the saltire cross and the motto within a circlet Nemo Me Impune Lacessit

Code: 20495Price: 110.00 GBP


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On War Service 1915 Munitions Badge with Serial Number Made by T Fattorini
On War Service 1915 badge. The On War Service 1915 badge was issued by the Ministry of Munitions, to women creating munitions for the war effort in 1915, one of the most hazardous occupations ever created, sadly it is not known how many women died making shells and amunition University of Manchester historian Dr Anne-Marie Claire Hughes said they were not officially recognised by the Government or the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

None of the victims' families received the death plaque or a scroll or letter and they also lost out on state benefits, she said.

Dr Hughes, from the university's School of Arts Histories and Cultures, said: "Though very sad, the omission of women working as munitions workers was not a result of any hostility towards women workers or prejudice by the authorities.
Indeed, many of the women who died were recognised during the war by their own communities and buried alongside their male comrades". Explosions at British munitions factories during World War I included the 1917 Silvertown explosion, in which 73 people were killed and over 400 injured, and a 1918 explosion at the National Shell Filling Factory, Chilwell, which killed over 130 workers
These metal badges were worn by civilians during the First World War in order to indicate that the person wearing it was on engaged in important war-work. Several of these badges were officially produced and distributed nationally but many more were produced privately by employing companies to support their employees. Before conscription was introduced in 1916, the army relied on voluntary recruitment. It was assumed by many that a man not in uniform was avoiding joining up and was therefore often accused of shirking their duty to their country. The famous white feather campaign saw men not in uniform presented with a white feather as a symbol of cowardice. The official badges were intended to prove that the wearer was doing their duty to their country in a time of war in a different way. They were not in uniform, but they may have been working in munitions factories or in the dockyards carrying out work that was vital to the war effort. After conscription, the need for these badges faded, along with the white feather campaign. However, many continued to be worn throughout the war, especially by female shift workers for whom the badge could give priority boarding and fare concessions on public transport, as well as indicating that there was nothing disreputable about these ladies travelling alone at night.

Code: 20494Price: 45.00 GBP


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A WW1 Royal Highlanders Black Watch Bi Colour Bonnet Glengarry Badge
A very good quality die struck 1st pattern badge in nice condition. Gilt and silver but gilt now worn. Acquired with medals but sold seperately. On the outbreak of war there were seven Black Watch battalions - for in addition to the Regular 1st and 2nd Battalions and 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion there were a further four Territorial ones which had become part of the Regiment in 1908. They were the 4th Dundee, 5th Angus, 6th Perthshire and the 7th Battalion from Fife. The 1st Battalion was in action at the very start of the war taking part in the Retreat from Mons before turning on the Germans at the River Marne and the subsequent advance to the Aisne. Trench warfare then set in and the 2nd Battalion arrived from India, both battalions taking part in the Battle of Givenchy. Meanwhile the Territorial battalions had been mobilised at the start of the war but only the 5th was in action in 1914. This year was to see the participation of all the Territorial battalions and some of the newly formed "Service Battalions" of the Regiment in the battles along the Western Front. The 2nd, 4th and 5th Battalions were at Neuve Chapelle in March and a total of six battalions fought at Festubert in May where two Victoria Crosses were won by members of the Regiment. Then in September came the initially successful but horrifically costly attacks at Loos in which the 9th Battalion suffered over 700 casualties. 1916

The 2nd Battalion was withdrawn from France for operations against the Turks in Mesopotamia for the attempted relief of Kut-el-Amara. Such was the urgency to get forward that the advance was made without proper preparation and heavy casualties were incurred. The losses at Shaikh Sa'ad were so heavy that the Battalion had to be merged temporarily with another Highland battalion which had suffered similarly. This year also saw the 10th Battalion taking part in operations in the Balkans. On the Western Front, 1916 was dominated by the Battle of the Somme. Five battalions of the Regiment were involved with particularly fierce actions at Contalmaison, High Wood, Delville Wood and Longueval - the last named changing frequently as the Germans counter-attacked and further assaults were made to regain it. Eventually it was held but by then the 8th Battalion was reduced to just 171 men. The year ended with the extremely hard fought battle at Beaumont-Hamel with the 6th and 7th Battalions particularly distinguishing themselves.

Code: 20493Price: 120.00 GBP


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Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

Winston Churchill

Code: 20492Price: On Request


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Historical Original German 3rd Reich Photograph By Hoffman
Photographed pre war, in the late 1930's by Hoffman, of Viktor Lutze, leader of the SA. An original photograph from Presse Illustration Hoffmann of Berlin and sent to London before the war for the International Graphic Press, Chancery Lane, for once use only, and intended for return. Stamped on reverse. All the copyrights are now expired of course. The war stopped the return of this historical archive and we were very fortunate to acquire it. We acquired the full collection that contains many original photographs of Hitler at rallies etc. and notables such as Baron Von Neurath [Reichs Protector of Czechoslovakia], Baldur Von Shirach [the Jugendfuhrer and Imperial Governor of Vienna], Richard Walter Darre [the Reich Agriculture Minister & Director of the Race and Settlement Office], Arthur Seyss-Inquart [The Gaulieter of Holland] and Victor Lutze [Leader of the SA] . This amazing original Hoffman photograph has not been seen on the open market since the war. Stamped Presse Hoffmann, and International Graphic Press with typed details mostly dated In addition to being an early member of the Nazi Party and a personal friend of Hitler, Heinrich Hoffmann was a professional photographer and the owner of a publishing house. He had personal and professional access to Hitler that no other photographer had, and achieved a favoured position in the publication and sale of photographs of Nazi political activities and formal and informal portraits of Hitler. Eva Braun [Hitler's mistress and latter day wife] was Hoffmann's assistant, and Hitler met her via a meeting with Hoffmann.This photo, that were originated and taken by the Hoffmann firm, are of political activities, rallies, meetings and personalities, and provide documentation of the economic, cultural,social and political life in Germany and, to a lesser extent, Europe as a whole. Some are taken just into the war for International Graphic Press. Hoffmann, who worked as a photographer in Munich from 1908, joined the Nazi party in 1920.

He was arrested by the Americans in May 1945 and after the war was tried and sentenced to four years for Nazi profiteering. Hitler and Hoffmann became close friends. Hoffman was part of the small party which drove to Landsberg Prison to get Hitler when he was released from prison on parole on December 20, 1924, and took his picture. Later, Hoffmann often dined with Hitler at the Berghof or at the Führer's favorite restaurant in Munich, the Osteria Bavaria, gossiping with him and sharing stories about the painters from Schwabing that Hoffmann knew. He accompanied Hitler on his unprecedented election campaign by air during the presidential election against Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1932. After Hitler took over the party in 1921, he named Hoffmann his official photographer, a post he held for over a quarter-century. No other photographer but Hoffmann was allowed to take pictures of Hitler, 5.75 inches x 7.5 inches

Code: 20491Price: 165.00 GBP


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A Very Good Luftwaffe Officers Pilots Dagger, Aeronautical Alloy Mounts
With white ivorine wirebound grip, and a very good blade with some original crossgraining. Aeronautical alloy pommel and crossguard to dagger, apparently the same alloy as usued in German fighter planes during the war. Overall in excellent plus condition but with signs of natural carrying wear. It is a superb original dagger, made by Alcoso of Solingen. Although, strictly speaking, pilots and officers were not allowed to carry their daggers on board their planes, many did. And there are a few in British museum collections, that were recovered or captured from downed pilots, during the blitz of London and the south coast. This is the pattern most commonly worn by the Battle of Britain pilots in Goring's Luftwaffe. Aero alloy hilt mounts, ivorine grip wire bound. Saved as a war souvenir of WW2 by a British soldier. It was in a brief meeting by one of our partners with former fighter hero and Luftwaffe ace, General Adolf Galland, in Brighton, Sussex, who mentioned and confirmed that the alloy hilt of the second pattern dagger was made with the same alloy as used in the Messerschmitt fighter planes. It has been the tradition of soldiers of all nations for thousands of years to claim trophies of war, for it was once written "Man thirsts more for glory than virtue. The armour of an enemy, his broken helmet, the flag ripped from a conquered trireme, are treasures valued beyond all human riches. It is to obtain these tokens of glory that Generals, be they Roman, Greek or barbarian, brave a thousand perils and endure a thousand exertions". Juvenal, Roman poet, Ist Century AD. Both swastikas on this dagger are clearly visible and undamaged to the top pommel. Good quality and defined Luftwaffe cross guard. The luftwaffe dagger is one of the most collectable of the German WW2 daggers for several reasons, firstly the romance of the fighter pilot, secondly it was a far smaller force so much fewer made than the SA or Army dagger, and the beauty of the dagger's design is unquestioned. Photos in the gallery of a similar officer as would have carried this dagger

Code: 20490Price: 855.00 GBP


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German Kriegsmarine High Seas Fleet Badge from Schwerin Berlin
A superb example of Das Flottenkriegsabzeichen . WW2 issue, by Adolf Bock, wreath gilded (and almost all the gold wash remains). Good pin and in very good condition for age. This is a German military decoration (worn on the lower part of the left breast pocket of the naval service tunic]. It was worn underneath the 1st class Iron Cross if awarded, [or equivalent grade) and awarded for combat service to the crews of the High Seas Fleet, mainly of the battleships and cruisers, but also those ships that supported them operationally for which there was no other award given. Required qualifications included e.g. active duty on 1 or more 12 week cruises, wounds or sinking in action. This striking design was created by the well known artist Adolf Bock of Berlin and the design was approved and adopted in 1941 by the then Grand Admiral Raeder, Commander in Chief of the German Navy. Although the award was instituted in 1941, awards could be rendered in retrospect of service from the beginning of World War II.

Although the award was instituted in April 1941, it could be awarded for actions that took place prior to this date and could highlight the struggle against the British fleet.To be eligible to receive the badge one must have twelve weeks service on a battleship or cruiser, with proof of distinction and good conduct. The number of weeks were reduced if one of these conditions were met:
If the recipient was wounded or killed during the voyage.
Outstanding achievements in an engagement.
If the cruise was successful.
Individual's ship was sunk in action. (Bismarck, Admiral Graf Spee, Blücher)
For participation in “Rawalpindi” and “Jan Mayen”.
All crew members of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau received the award in view of the operational effectiveness of the ships.
To every sailor who was present on the Tirpitz when it was bombed and sunk by the British R.A.F. in Tromsö Fjord on November 12th, 1944.

Code: 20489Price: 495.00 GBP


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Amazing & Historical Original German 3rd Reich Photograph By Hoffman
Photographed pre war, in the late 1930's by Hoffman, of Baron Von Neurath [Reichs Protector of Czechoslovakia]. An original photograph from Presse Illustration Hoffmann of Berlin and sent to London before the war for the International Graphic Press, Chancery Lane, for once use only, and intended for return. Stamped copyright and 'THIS ORIGINAL MUST BE RETURNED' . This original was also the one used for the Hoffman famous photo album on the life of Hitler. All the copyrights are now expired of course. The war stopped the return of this historical archive and we were very fortunate to acquire it. We acquired the full collection that contains many original photographs of Hitler at rallies etc. and notables such as Baron Von Neurath [Reichs Protector of Czechoslovakia], Baldur Von Shirach [the Jugendfuhrer and Imperial Governor of Vienna], Richard Walter Darre [the Reich Agriculture Minister & Director of the Race and Settlement Office], Arthur Seyss-Inquart [The Gaulieter of Holland] and Victor Lutze [Leader of the SA] . This amazing original Hoffman photograph has not been seen on the open market since the war. Stamped Presse Hoffmann, and International Graphic Press with typed details mostly dated In addition to being an early member of the Nazi Party and a personal friend of Hitler, Heinrich Hoffmann was a professional photographer and the owner of a publishing house. He had personal and professional access to Hitler that no other photographer had, and achieved a favoured position in the publication and sale of photographs of Nazi political activities and formal and informal portraits of Hitler. Eva Braun [Hitler's mistress and latter day wife] was Hoffmann's assistant, and Hitler met her via a meeting with Hoffmann.This photo, that were originated and taken by the Hoffmann firm, are of political activities, rallies, meetings and personalities, and provide documentation of the economic, cultural,social and political life in Germany and, to a lesser extent, Europe as a whole. Some are taken just into the war for International Graphic Press. Konstantin Hermann Karl Freiherr von Neurath (2 February 1873 – 14 August 1956) was a German diplomat remembered mostly for having served as Foreign minister of Germany between 1932 and 1938. Holding this post in the early years of Adolf Hitler's regime, Neurath was regarded as playing a key role in the foreign policy pursuits of the Nazi dictator in undermining the Treaty of Versailles and territorial expansion in the prelude to World War II, although he was often averse tactically if not necessarily ideologically. This aversion eventually induced Hitler to replace Neurath with the more compliant and fervent Nazi Joachim von Ribbentrop.

Neurath served as "Reichsprotektor of Bohemia and Moravia" between 1939 and 1943, though his authority was only nominal after September 1941. He was tried as a major war criminal in Nuremberg and sentenced to fifteen years' imprisonment for his compliance and actions in the Nazi regime. Hoffmann, who worked as a photographer in Munich from 1908, joined the Nazi party in 1920.

He was arrested by the Americans in May 1945 and after the war was tried and sentenced to four years for Nazi profiteering. Hitler and Hoffmann became close friends. Hoffman was part of the small party which drove to Landsberg Prison to get Hitler when he was released from prison on parole on December 20, 1924, and took his picture. Later, Hoffmann often dined with Hitler at the Berghof or at the Führer's favorite restaurant in Munich, the Osteria Bavaria, gossiping with him and sharing stories about the painters from Schwabing that Hoffmann knew. He accompanied Hitler on his unprecedented election campaign by air during the presidential election against Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg in 1932. After Hitler took over the party in 1921, he named Hoffmann his official photographer, a post he held for over a quarter-century. No other photographer but Hoffmann was allowed to take pictures of Hitler, 5 inches x 7.2 inches

Code: 20488Price: 175.00 GBP

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