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A Most Attractive Shinto to Shinshinto Period Later Edo Samurai Tachi.
18th to early 19th century blade and matching fittings with fine nishiji gold flake lacquer. Beautiful blade with regular gunome hamon. A tachi was a type of traditionally made Japanese sword (nihonto) worn by the samurai class of feudal Japan. The tachi style of swords preceded the development of the katana — the first use of the word katana to indicate a blade different from tachi appears toward the end of the twelfth century. In later Japanese feudal history, during the Sengoku and Edo periods, certain high-ranking warriors of what became the ruling class would wear their sword tachi-style (edge-downward), rather than with the saya (scabbard) thrust through the belt with the edge upward. The bakuhan taisei was the feudal political system in the Edo period of Japan. Baku, or "tent," is an abbreviation of bakufu, meaning "military government" — that is, the shogunate. The han were the domains headed by daimyo. Tachi are the Samurai swords worn on Court occasions by the Daimyo Lords of Japan. They are distinguished by the fact that they are worn with the cutting edge down, from one or two hangers in the centre of the saya. Katana are slid through the belt or Obi, and thus do not have these two hangers. Traditionally in the Edo era only Daimyo are allowed to wear Tachi and there were only about 50 Daimyo in any one period in all Japan.
In later Japanese feudal history, during the Sengoku and Edo periods, certain high-ranking warriors [daimyo] of what became the ruling class would wear their swords tachi mounted. This Tachi is fully Edo with all the fittings and blade from the Edo era. The Edo started with the Tokugawa, who ruled Japan for around 460 years and it was founded after the battle of Sekigahara in 1598.

Code: 20355Price: 3875.00 GBP


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A Superb Original Antique Leather Machine Gun Company Munition Case
WW1 issue. Bearing the royal crest of King George Vth and British Army stamped for the 6th, 261 Machine Gun Company [6 261 MGC]. Substantially strong and robust hardened buffalo hide. This is a particularly rare type is of heavy grade solid leather, that is top, bottom and side, brass seam riveted, and with a wide leather carrying strap at the rear. The more common version used by the British army was a cordite carrier type, that are plain, lightweight and have no rivets, cork lined and are wide rim banded top and bottom. At the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, the tactical potential of machine guns was not appreciated by the British armed forces. The prevalent attitude of senior ranks at the outbreak of the Great War can be summed up by the opinion of an officer (albeit expressed a decade earlier) that a single battery of machine guns per army corps was a sufficient level of issue.
Despite the evidence of fighting in Manchuria (1905 onwards) the Army therefore went to war with each infantry battalion and cavalry regiment containing a machine gun section of just two guns.
These organic (embedded) units were supplemented in November 1914 by the formation of the Motor Machine Gun Service (MMGS) administered by the Royal Artillery, consisting of motor-cycle mounted machine gun batteries.
A machine gun school was also opened in France.
After a year of warfare on the Western Front it was self-evident that to be fully effective - in the opinion of former sceptics - that machine guns must be used in larger units and some commanders advocated crewing them with specially trained men who not only thoroughly conversant with their weapons but who understood how they should be best deployed for maximum effect. To achieve this, the Machine Gun Corps was formed in October 1915 with Infantry, Cavalry, and Motor branches, followed in 1916 by the Heavy Branch. A depot and training centre was established at Belton Park in Grantham, Lincolnshire, and a base depôt at Camiers in France.
The Infantry Branch was by far the largest and was formed by the transfer of battalion machine gun sections to the MGC. These sections were grouped into Brigade Machine Gun Companies, three per division. New companies were raised at Grantham. In 1917, a fourth company was added to each division. In February and March 1918, the four companies in each division were formed into a Machine Gun Battalion.
The Guards Division formed its own machine gun support unit, the Guards Machine Gun Regiment.
The Cavalry Branch consisted of Machine Gun Squadrons, one per cavalry brigade.
The Motor Branch was formed by absorbing the MMGS and the armoured car squadrons of the recently disbanded Royal Naval Armoured Car Service. It formed several types of units: motor cycle batteries, light armoured motor batteries (LAMB) and light car patrols. As well as motor cycles, other vehicles used included Rolls-Royce and Ford Model T cars.
The Heavy Section was formed in March 1916, becoming the Heavy Branch in November of that year. Men of this branch crewed the first tanks in action at Flers, during the Battle of the Somme in September 1916. In July 1917, the Heavy Branch separated from the MGC to become the Tank Corps, later called the Royal Tank Regiment.

The MGC saw action in all the main theatres of war, including France, Belgium, Palestine, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Salonika, East Africa and Italy. In its short history, the MGC gained an enviable record for heroism as a front line fighting force. Indeed, in the latter part of the war, as tactics changed to defence in depth, it commonly served well in advance of the front line. It had a less enviable record for its casualty rate, with 62,049 becoming casualties, including 12,498 killed, earning it the nickname 'the Suicide Club'.
A fabulous and beautiful artifact of WW1 Machine Gun Corps history, that is now perfectly useable as a stunning display piece, or stick stand or waste paper basket. Top section of rear leather strap handle is now detached, but it should be easily repairable. 14 inches high x 7.5 inches across

Code: 20353Price: 795.00 GBP


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A Fabulous 1821 Pattern British Cavalry Officers Sabre Crimean War Period
An absolute beautiful, original, antique Victorian bright and crisp battle-cum-dress sword used by a British light cavalry, hussar and lancer officer during the Crimean War, and in the Charge of the Light Brigade period. The sword is superbly balanced in wonderful condition.It has signs of combat use but is stunningly well preserved. The very type of Hussar's and Lancer's sabre as used by British Cavalry Officer's in the ill fated charge in the Crimean War against Russia. Full original triple wire binding over complete fish skin grip. This is the form and pattern of sword used by the serving Cavalry officer in the Crimean War , and later in The Indian Mutiny, and all the major conflicts involving the light cavalry regiments [Dragoons, Hussars and Lancers] in the 19th century. In the Crimean War (1854-56), the Light Dragoons were in the forefront of the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized by Tennyson's poem of that name ("Into the valley of death rode the six hundred").
The regiments adopted the title hussars at this time, and the uniform became very stylish, aping the hussars of the Austro-Hungarian army. But soon the blues and yellows and golds gave way to khaki as the British army found itself in skirmishes throughout the far-flung Empire, in India and South Africa especially.
In 1854 the regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five
transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking
between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a
troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the
entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th
Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of
Cardigan) were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera.
On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route.
On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major
engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left
flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by
late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the
brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry
in reserve.

During the 25 October the regiments, the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of
Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade.
The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the
4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his
men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th
and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting
down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed,
they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavouring to surround them
by closing in on either flank. However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. Capt. Louis Edward Nolan (January 4 1818-October 25 1854), who was a British Army officer of the Victorian era, an authority on cavalry tactics, and best known for his controversial role in launching the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Battle of Balaclava. He was the first casualty of that engagement. His identical 1821 pattern sword can be plainly seen in that painting. The inner thin bar guard has been purposefully removed to stop wear against the owners uniform. 32 inch blade. No scabbard

Code: 20352Price: 895.00 GBP


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A Set of Fine Kriegsmarine WW2 Naval Combat Visor Cap Badges
Eagle in die stamped metal gilded with two pins, measuring 70 mm, In nice condition; cockade is a wartime version of the 1935 pattern, in stamped metal gilt oak leaves; with painted national tri-colour roundel; on Kriegsmarine navy coloured backer; blue/purple cloth on reverse, with three affixing pins, uniform removed; We show a photo in the gallery of Erich Topp, Uboat commander wearing his cap. Erich Topp, the third top scoring U-boat commander of World War II, is credited with sinking 34 ships totaling 193,684 tons. Born in Hanover on July 2, 1914, Topp joined the German Navy in April 1934. He served six months aboard the light cruiser Karlsruhe before transferring to the U-boat service in October 1937

Code: 20350Price: 260.00 GBP


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The Gun Report Volume III No 5 October 1957
We have just acquired over two hundred archived copies of the Gun Report From the 1950's to 1980. They are simply wonderful reading, and fabulous reference works, with advertisements and reports that likely will never be seen again. A little bit of history with lots of information, photos and enjoyment, nicely bound.
Aledo IL World-Wide Gun Report 1957 Soft cover. Very Good Magazine. Very good condition, light cover wear. Boutet Gun Designer by F Theodore Dexter, Specialization by Robert A Erlandson, Captain David L Payne by Chester C Heizer, Powder Horns by Chester Williams, Old Time Bullet Seaters by Richard H Chamberlain, 60070-60072, From Rodent Rifle to "Gangster's Gat" by James A Leftwich, Who's Who in the Gun World (Featuring John Roten, Wharton, TX) by Annie Lee Williams, A Restored Flintlock Pistol by Ronald Lister, The Story of the Alamo Part I by Paul C Janke. 48 pages. 11 1/2" X 8 1/2" format

Code: 20344Price: 15.00 GBP


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The Gun Report Magazine March 1958 Volume III No. 10
We have just acquired over two hundred archived copies of the Gun Report From the 1950's to 1980. They are simply wonderful reading, and fabulous reference works, with advertisements and reports that likely will never be seen again. A little bit of history with lots of information, photos and enjoyment, nicely bound. The Gun Report Volume III No 10 March 1958
Aledo IL World-Wide Gun Report 1958 Soft cover Very Good Book
Softcover. In very good condition, light cover. Civil War Five Per-Center by Donald B Webster Jr, US Martial Inspection (Part II) by Lt Col R C Kuhn, Jim Bowie by Charles L Durfee, In Defense of Ambrose by Graham Burnside, A Tow Flintlock by Ronald Lister, Merwin's Demise by Jerald T Teesdale, Frontier Marksmen by George D Wolfe, 100 Thunders by F Theodore Dexter, Sharpes Rifles and Buffaloes by Richard H Chamberlain, Galveston Drill Exhibition and more.
Good vintage condition with minimal wear, nice and tight binding, A very interesting magazine for the antique and vintage collecting or shooting enthusiast. 48 pages in a 11 1/2" X 8 1/2" format

Code: 20343Price: 15.00 GBP


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SUPERB SIGNED SAMURAI SWORD DISCOUNT OFFER!!! Save An Amazing £3,000
HUGELY DISCOUNTED ORIGINAL AND STUNNING ANTIQUE SAMURAI SWORD SAVING AN AMAZING £3000, and thus sold at well below our actual cost from our back catalogue. Act fast though our below cost discounted swords never last long!! Signed by Tokumune of Hitachi. A stunningly beautiful signed blade, a true battle sword, in delightful condition. Previously offered for sale in our back catalogue, and now we have reduced it on special discount offer from £6750 to an unbelievable £3,750, SAVING A MASSIVE £3000 [as this is well below cost offer, it is for a 'regular', immediate sale only, and not eligible for any part exchange or lay away]. Our shop is particularly stacked to the rafters and we simply have no room left. Our regulars know we only offer one-off sale items just a very few times a year, and it is usually to pre-empt and influx of our new collection of antique samurai swords, that are due in soon, and it is always aimed for the benefit at our regular customers who view our site every day or week.
A very similar samurai sword, bearing the same name and signature Tokumune smith, Tokumune of Mito [also known as Norimune], sold in Czerny's International Auction House in Italy last September, LOT NUMBER 246 for 10,000 Euros. A superb and stunning Edo period Samurai katana, an original antique Shinshinto katana signed Hitachi Tokumune. Strong battle-blade in the style of Kinno-to (the Imperialists' swords), made during the Bakumatsu period. Kanai Norimune (or Tokumune, in accordance with the Tokugawa, lords of the Mito domain) was born in 1827 and died in 1899; he was Tokurin's pupil and used to manage the manufacturing of the well-known Kinno-to swords. The blade with two mekugi-ana, notare-midare hamon, fully original Edo period silk bound tsuka, in gold, with shakudo-nanako fuchi-kashira decorated with peonies in gold and silver, shakudo and gold floral menuki, and circular sukashi tsuba chiselled and pierced with flowering branches, in its black lacquered saya complete with shakudo-nanako kodzuka and kogai each decorated with different leaves and flowers in shakudo and gold. Signed Hitachi Kuni Mito ju Tokumune
65 cm. Blade. The blade shows a beautiful hamon [with crab claw] and very good grain to the hada. 26.5 inch blade length, Tsuba to tip. Overall 39 inches long in saya

Code: 20342Price: 3750.00 GBP


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A Fine Shinto Katana Signed By Kiyomitsu Circa 1670
A good Shinto smith that had a most distinctive angular cut finish to his blades nakago, they are the sogi-otoshi (Shaved off ) type. Fine fushi kashira of patinated copper with pure gold relief decoration of a fully armoured samurai oh horseback the kashira depicts the samurai with his bow held between his teeth, the samurai on the fushi is riding his horse crossing a rough river holding his bow and his tachi at his waist. The tsuba has a silver applied rim and the design is sukashi piercings showing a circle of arrow flights to complement the fittings. The blade is in need of polishing. Starting around the year 1400, long swords signed with the "katana" signature were made. This was in response to samurai wearing their tachi in what is now called "katana style" (cutting edge up). Japanese swords are traditionally worn with the signature facing away from the wearer. When a tachi was worn in the style of a katana, with the cutting edge up, the tachi's signature would be facing the wrong way. The fact that swordsmiths started signing swords with a katana signature shows that some samurai of that time period had started wearing their swords in a different manner. However, it is thought by many, that as many as 70% of katana made were never signed at all. 25 inch blade tsuba to tip.37.75 inches long in saya overall

Code: 20341Price: 4750.00 GBP


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A WW2 German Luftwaffe Service Belt Buckle Maker Marked and Dated 1940
Made by H Aurich, Dresden.

Code: 20340Price: 135.00 GBP


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A Koto Period Katana, Partial Remaining Bladesmith Signature
Signed dragon sword mounts in patinated copper and gold. Ishime stone effect lacquer saya. Mokko iron tsuba inlaid with relief figures. The production of swords in Japan is divided into specific time periods: jokoto (Ancient swords, until around 900 A.D.), koto (old swords from around 900–1596), shinto (new swords 1596–1780), shinshinto (new new swords 1781–1876), traditional gendaito (modern swords 1876–1945). Blade could be improved with repolishing.

The first use of "katana" as a word to describe a long sword that was different from a tachi is found in the 12th century. These references to "uchigatana" and "tsubagatana" seem to indicate a different style of sword, possibly a less costly sword for lower ranking warriors. The evolution of the tachi into the katana seems to have started during the early Muromachi period (1337 to 1573). Starting around the year 1400, long swords signed with the "katana" signature were made. This was in response to samurai wearing their tachi in what is now called "katana style" (cutting edge up). Japanese swords are traditionally worn with the signature facing away from the wearer. When a tachi was worn in the style of a katana, with the cutting edge up, the tachi's signature would be facing the wrong way. The fact that swordsmiths started signing swords with a katana signature shows that some samurai of that time period had started wearing their swords in a different manner. However, it is thought by many, that as many as 70% of katana made were never signed at all.

The rise in popularity of katana by samurai is believed to have been due to the changing nature of close-combat warfare. The quicker draw of the sword was well suited to combat where victory depended heavily on fast response times. The katana further facilitated this by being worn thrust through a belt-like sash (obi) with the sharpened edge facing up. Ideally, samurai could draw the sword and strike the enemy in a single motion. Previously, the curved tachi had been worn with the edge of the blade facing down and suspended from a belt

The length of the katana blade varied considerably during the course of its history. In the late 14th and early 15th centuries, katana blades tended to be between 68 to 73 cm (26 to 28 in) in length. During the early 16th century, the average length was closer to 60 cm (23.5 in). By the late 16th century, the average length returned to greater lengths. However, with every new owner [and early blades may have had 20 owners] the blade could be reduced if required to fit, and the shorter samurai would need shorter swords however long the considered norm may have been. 37.5 inches long in saya. 27.5 inch blade from tsuba to tip.

Code: 20339Price: 4950.00 GBP

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