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A Rare, Signed, Japanese Uke-Zutsu, A Sashimono Holder Worn By The Samurai
An old Edo period piece, probably 17th to 18th century. A long tubular or square sided lacquered wooden mount, with a brass strengthening top piece, with which to carry the samurai's sashimono, clan banner, on the samurai's armour cuirass backplate. Although it appears to be a relatively simple piece it is a most rare original antique collectable that simply near impossible to find if one is needed. Sashimono poles were attached to the backs of the chest armour worn by samurai by special fittings. Sashimono were worn by basic foot combat samurai called ashigaru and the elite samurai who were both mounted on horses or fought on foot, and in special holders on the horses of some cavalry samurai. The banners, resembling small flags and bearing clan symbols, were most prominent during the Sengoku period—a long period of civil war in Japan from the middle 15th to early 17th century. The designs on sashimono were usually very simple geometric shapes, sometimes accompanied by Japanese characters providing the name of the leader or clan, the clan's mon, or a clan's slogan. Often, the background colour of the flag indicated which army unit the wearer belonged to, while different divisions in these armies emblazoned their own design or logo on it. However, the presence of the daimyo's mon was used more commonly than the design or logo of the unit, as battles could often get quite large and complicated; being able to recognize friend from foe at a glance is of the utmost importance in battle. Sometimes elite samurai, who were sufficiently famed or respected, had their own personal design or name featured on their sashimono as opposed to that of their division. These stylized designs contrast with the elaborate heraldic devices displayed by some European armies of the same period.

Code: 20286Price: 365.00 GBP


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A Good Original WW2 Gurkha's Military Kukri
In overall good combat condition. Excellent blade, carved wooden hilt and leather covered wood scabbard with old leather wear to the rear of the scabbard. The Kukri is the renown and famous weapon of the Nepalese British Army Gurkha. Probably the most respected and feared warriors in the world, the Gurkhas of Nepal have fought in the Gurkha regiments of the British Army for around two centuries. With a degree of loyalty and dedication that is legendary, there is no greater soldier to be at one's side when in battle than the noble Gurkha. With a Kukri in his hand and the battle cry called, "Ayo Gorkhali!" ["the Gurkhas are coming!"], no foe's head was safe on his shoulders. Battle hardened German Infantry in WW1, or WW2 Japanese Shock Troops, have been known to tremble in their boots at the knowledge that they would be facing the Gurkhas in battle. Some of the most amazing feats of heroism have resulted in the most revered medal, the British Victoria Cross [ the world's greatest and most difficult to qualify for gallantry medal] being awarded to Ghurkas. The blade shape descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, which is about 2500 years old.
Field Marshall Sam Manekshaw once said, " If someone says he does not fear death, then he is telling lie or he is a Gurkha". On 12/13 May 1945 at Taungdaw, Burma [now Myanmar], Rifleman Lachhiman Gurung VC was manning the most forward post of his platoon which bore the brunt of an attack by at least 200 of the Japanese enemy. Twice he hurled back grenades which had fallen on his trench, but the third exploded in his right hand, blowing off his fingers, shattering his arm and severely wounding him in the face, body and right leg. His two comrades were also badly wounded but the rifleman, now alone and disregarding his wounds, loaded and fired his rifle with his left hand for four hours, calmly waiting for each attack which he met with fire at point blank range. Afterwards, when the casualties were counted, it is reported that there were 31 dead Japanese around his position which he had killed, with only one arm. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with the Khukuri or Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against.

Code: 20285Price: 325.00 GBP


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A Very Good 18th Century Indian Bischawa 'Scorpion' Dagger
An most interesting and rare dagger called a Bichwa from Southern India. Known as a 'scorpion sting' dagger for the recurved shape of its blade and presumably its lethalness, these forms of dagger were used primarily by assassins, and for concealment in close fighting, the looped grip fitting into the palm of the hand and the guard over the finger could be used to parry and to punch. They were also famed for being worn on the foot by those adept at using foot combat. A famous figure from Indian history was attacked by this very form of assassin dagger, his name was Afzal Khan. He was an Afghan commander who served the Adil Shahi dynasty of Bijapur, and fought against the Marathas. After he treacherously tried to murder the Maratha chief Shivaji during a meeting, he was violently killed by the Marathas, and his army was defeated in the Battle of Pratapgad in 1659. A meeting was arranged before the battle, between the two great warrior Generals, Afzal Khan and Shivaji, likely to discuss proposals for surrender or truce. However, Shivaji was warned of Khan's intended treacherous nature, so he protected himself by wearing concealed armour and carried a tigers claw and a scorpion's sting. At the pre-arranged meeting Afzal Khan graciously embraced Shivaji as per custom. But then he suddenly tightened his clasp, gripped Shivaji's neck in his left arm and struck him with a katar. Shivaji, saved by his concealed armour, recovered and counter-attacked Afzal Khan with wagh nakh [tiger's claw], disemboweling him. He then stabbed Khan with his bichawa [scorpion sting dagger], and ran out of the tent towards his men.

Afzal Khan cried out and Sayeed Banda, his protector who was regarded the best swordsman in the whole of Decca at that time, rushed to the scene and attacked Shivaji with his patta, cutting his turban. Shivaji's bodyguard Jiva Mahala intervened, chopping off Sayeed Banda' s right arm in a quick combat before killing him.

Meanwhile, Afzal Khan's bearers placed their wounded leader in his palki (litter vehicle), but they were attacked by Sambhaji Kavji. Sambhaji eventually killed Afzal Khan by decapitating him

Code: 20283Price: 375.00 GBP


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An Intricately Made Arabian Jambiya
In white metal. The jambia, a curved Islamic dagger, is the main customary accessory to the clothing worn by Arabian men. For centuries the people of South Arabia have inherited their jambiahs from generation to generation. There are several theories about the origin of the Jambia. There are historical facts, concerning the existence of the Jambia revealing that it used to be worn at Sheban times, in the Himiarite kingdom. They take the statue of the Sheban king (Madi Karb 500 bc ) as proof. This statue, which was discovered by an American mission in Marib in the 1950s, was found to be wearing a Jambia.
Since The most expensive and famous jambiya was purchased by Sheikh Naji Bin Abdul-Aziz Al-Sha’if, who was able to pay US $1 million for one prized and ancient piece. This jambiah had a historical importance, belonging to Imam Ahmed Hamid Al-Din, who ruled Yemen from 1948 to 1962. The Imam’s most precious possession was transferred to Sheikh Hussein Al-Watari, who in turn sold it to Sheikh Al-Sha’if.
According to Sheikh Muhammad Naji, the son of current owner of the most precious jambiah, his father’s prize is the most expensive and famous one in the country. Its cost was made so high because it is one of the best jambiahs ever made by Al-Saifani, and a piece of history, as well.

Code: 20282Price: 185.00 GBP


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On War Service 1915 Munitions Badge with Serial Number JR GAUNT & SON LTD
On War Service 1915 badge. The On War Service 1915 badge was issued by the Ministry of Munitions, to women creating munitions for the war effort in 1915, one of the most hazardous occupations ever created, sadly it is not known how many women died making shells and amunition University of Manchester historian Dr Anne-Marie Claire Hughes said they were not officially recognised by the Government or the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

None of the victims' families received the death plaque or a scroll or letter and they also lost out on state benefits, she said.

Dr Hughes, from the university's School of Arts Histories and Cultures, said: "Though very sad, the omission of women working as munitions workers was not a result of any hostility towards women workers or prejudice by the authorities.
Indeed, many of the women who died were recognised during the war by their own communities and buried alongside their male comrades". Explosions at British munitions factories during World War I included the 1917 Silvertown explosion, in which 73 people were killed and over 400 injured, and a 1918 explosion at the National Shell Filling Factory, Chilwell, which killed over 130 workers
These metal badges were worn by civilians during the First World War in order to indicate that the person wearing it was on engaged in important war-work. Several of these badges were officially produced and distributed nationally but many more were produced privately by employing companies to support their employees. Before conscription was introduced in 1916, the army relied on voluntary recruitment. It was assumed by many that a man not in uniform was avoiding joining up and was therefore often accused of shirking their duty to their country. The famous white feather campaign saw men not in uniform presented with a white feather as a symbol of cowardice. The official badges were intended to prove that the wearer was doing their duty to their country in a time of war in a different way. They were not in uniform, but they may have been working in munitions factories or in the dockyards carrying out work that was vital to the war effort. After conscription, the need for these badges faded, along with the white feather campaign. However, many continued to be worn throughout the war, especially by female shift workers for whom the badge could give priority boarding and fare concessions on public transport, as well as indicating that there was nothing disreputable about these ladies travelling alone at night.

Code: 20281Price: 45.00 GBP


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An Important and Scarce Silver Sudan Ordnance Corps Cap Badge WW2
A rare officer's badge used in the Libyan dessert campaign in WW2, and detachments of Sudan Ordnance Corps, were part of the Sudan Defence Force. The badge is super and shows 70 odd years of original age patina. The SDF along with SOC played an active role during the Western Desert Campaign along the Sudanese border with ASI in North Africa. The SDF was used to supply the Free French and then the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) garrisons of the former Italian Fort Taj at the Kufra oasis in southeastern Libya. In March 1941, French and LRDG forces had wrested control of the fort from the Italians during the Battle of Kufra.

SDF convoys of 3-ton trucks had to make a round trip of about 1,300 miles to keep the garrisons at Kufra supplied with petrol, food, ordnance, and other vital supplies. The overall scarcity of petrol meant that LRDG patrols could do little more than guard Kufra against attacks from the north. They were unable to raid northwards from Kufra. In February 1941, the situation was somewhat improved when twenty 10-ton trucks were added to the convoys. Ultimately the SDF took over the garrison duties at the oasis from the LRDG.

The SDF provided the garrison for Jalo Oasis. British Military Intelligence in Cairo worked very closely with the SDF and used them in numerous operations during the North African campaign in World War II. In 1942 on instructions from London, British Military Intelligence, Cairo and elements of the Sudan Defence Force were involved with countering Operation Salaam, the infiltration of German Brandenburger commandos into Egypt. Together with British intelligence agents, members of the SDF were ordered to intercept and capture the German intelligence (Abwehr) commandos and their Hungarian guide, desert explorer László Almásy.

Even after the Tunisian Campaign had ended in Allied victory, SDF patrols were busy thwarting German efforts to land agents behind the lines. The Germans continued attempts to make contact with Arab rebels. On 15 May 1943, a four-engine aircraft with German markings attempted to land at El Mukaram only to be engaged and shot up by a SDF patrol. The aircraft was able to take off and make good its escape, but it did so with casualties and flying on two engines.

By the end of the war, the SDF was an experienced military force with about 70 Sudanese officers, almost all of them Muslim northerners. Gradually Sudanese officers were appointed to replace British officers in the years that preceded independence.

Code: 20280Price: 145.00 GBP


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A Beautiful Sudanese Sleeve Dagger Ivory Ebony and Silver From Omdurman
The hilt is very nice quality with deluxe grade materials but just the pommel was damaged in combat. Brought back as a war souvenir from Omdurman from the descendant family of a 21st Lancer officer. At around 9.30 am on 2 September 1898, on the Kerreri Plain outside the city of Omdurman, Lt Col Rowland Martin of the 21st Lancers turned to Sergeant Trumpeter Knight and gave the order "Right wheel into line!" About twenty minutes later 21 of the 440-strong regiment were dead and 71 wounded - many of them hideously, with sword and barbed spear; acts of gallantry had been performed which would bring three Victoria Crosses, and a unique distinction at the hands of the Queen Empress; they had driven two thousand of the Mahdist enemy out of the path of General Kitchener's advance - as ordered; and a stirring chapter had been added to the legend of young Winston Churchill. They had also started a controversy, which can still raise hackles to this day. Before the charge was ever launched, the battle of Omdurman had already been won by magazine rifles, Maxim guns and high explosive shells. Yet those few moments of bloody, face-to-face fighting, had a huge significance for the regiment, and for the British cavalry arm as a whole. In the battle madness of that charge, the Regiment released tensions, which had been festering for decades - some might argue for 138 years, since the regiment was first raised in 1760. The Lancers had been looking forward expressly to the moment since their arrival in Egypt two years previously and had feared that they would be denied it. New weapons, and the new tactics they demanded, were changing the face of warfare before their eyes. They were preoccupied by the foreboding that the centuries old cavalry spirit - the spirit which animated the wild dash of horse and rider, steel in hand for death or glory - was to be discarded in favour of the drab utility of mounted infantry.
In the event, their foreboding was justified: it is generally accepted that the 21st at Omdurman made the British Army's last true regimental cavalry charge against a standing army.
Lieutenant Winston Churchill, who rode with the 21st Lancers at Omdurman, estimated that the charge lasted two minutes. Yet just over 100 years later it still excites our fascination with the mad dash of the cavalry and a clash with the enemy. '' Thus ended the Battle of Omdurman---the most signal triumph ever gained by the arms of science over barbarians. Within the space of five hours the strongest and best-armed savage army yet arrayed against a modern European Power had been destroyed and dispersed, with hardly any difficulty, comparatively small risk, and insignificant loss to the victors.'' Quote from Winston S. Churchill, in his personal account and 2 volume book 'The River War'. Published in1899. Ovarall 11 inches long complete, blade 6.6 inches long x 1.15 inches at widest

Code: 20279Price: 225.00 GBP


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A Superb 19th Century Sudanese Long Dagger in Crocodile Skin Scabbard
a long dagger almost short sword length. 16.5 inches long in scabbard. Brought back as a war souvenir from Omdurman from the descendant family of a 21st Lancer officer. At around 9.30 am on 2 September 1898, on the Kerreri Plain outside the city of Omdurman, Lt Col Rowland Martin of the 21st Lancers turned to Sergeant Trumpeter Knight and gave the order "Right wheel into line!" About twenty minutes later 21 of the 440-strong regiment were dead and 71 wounded - many of them hideously, with sword and barbed spear; acts of gallantry had been performed which would bring three Victoria Crosses, and a unique distinction at the hands of the Queen Empress; they had driven two thousand of the Mahdist enemy out of the path of General Kitchener's advance - as ordered; and a stirring chapter had been added to the legend of young Winston Churchill. They had also started a controversy, which can still raise hackles to this day. Before the charge was ever launched, the battle of Omdurman had already been won by magazine rifles, Maxim guns and high explosive shells. Yet those few moments of bloody, face-to-face fighting, had a huge significance for the regiment, and for the British cavalry arm as a whole. In the battle madness of that charge, the Regiment released tensions, which had been festering for decades - some might argue for 138 years, since the regiment was first raised in 1760. The Lancers had been looking forward expressly to the moment since their arrival in Egypt two years previously and had feared that they would be denied it. New weapons, and the new tactics they demanded, were changing the face of warfare before their eyes. They were preoccupied by the foreboding that the centuries old cavalry spirit - the spirit which animated the wild dash of horse and rider, steel in hand for death or glory - was to be discarded in favour of the drab utility of mounted infantry.
In the event, their foreboding was justified: it is generally accepted that the 21st at Omdurman made the British Army's last true regimental cavalry charge against a standing army.
Lieutenant Winston Churchill, who rode with the 21st Lancers at Omdurman, estimated that the charge lasted two minutes. Yet just over 100 years later it still excites our fascination with the mad dash of the cavalry and a clash with the enemy. '' Thus ended the Battle of Omdurman---the most signal triumph ever gained by the arms of science over barbarians. Within the space of five hours the strongest and best-armed savage army yet arrayed against a modern European Power had been destroyed and dispersed, with hardly any difficulty, comparatively small risk, and insignificant loss to the victors.'' Quote from Winston S. Churchill, in his personal account and 2 volume book 'The River War'. Published in1899. Blade 10.75 inches long x 1.3 inches wide at widest.

Code: 20278Price: 240.00 GBP


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Why Not Give a Fabulous Samurai Sword or Dagger For Christmas
A unique and amazing idea that represents the ultimate symbol of some of the greatest warriors in history. Some of our Japanese swords and daggers are up to an incredible 800 years old and still look almost as new. No other countries swords, of comparable age, have ever remotely survived in the condition that our samurai swords have. Known in Japan as 'art swords' due to their incredible aesthetic qualities, with fittings and mounts that can represent some of the greatest skills that Japanese artisans can create for the sake of visual display. And as the leading original antique Japanese weaponry store in Europe we can offer a selection second to none in the world of collecting.

Code: 20277Price: On Request


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An All Silver Mounted Gurkha Presentation Kukri and Stand
Not antique but a wonderful quality piece, ideal for presentation as a gift and spectacularly impressive. With very fine silver scroll decoration and overlay decoration throughout and gilt inlaid blade, carved buffalo horn hilt and two side knives, one for cutting the other for creating spaks for fires. Some say the kukri originated from a form of knife first used by the Mallas who came to power in Nepal in the 13th Century. There are some Khukuris displaying on the walls of National Museum at Chhauni in Kathmandu which are 500 years old or even older, among them, one that once belonged to Drabya Shah, the founder king of the kingdom of Gorkha, in 1627 AD. But, some say that the Khukuri's history is possibly centuries older this. It is suggested that the Khukuri was first used by Kiratis who came to power in Nepal before Lichchhavi age, in about the 7th Century. In the hands of an experienced wielder Khukuri or Kukri is about as formidable a weapon as can be conceived. Like all really good weapons, Khukuri's or Kukri's efficiency depends much more upon skill than the strength of the wielder. And thus so that it happens, that a diminutive Gurkha, a mere boy in regards to his stature, could easily cut to pieces a gigantic adversary, who simply does not understand the little Gurkha's mode of attack and fearsome skill. The Gurkha generally strikes upwards with his Kukri, possibly in order to avoid wounding himself should his blow fail, and possibly because an upward cut is just the one that can be least guarded against however strong his opponent.

Code: 20276Price: 495.00 GBP

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