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A Superb Cased WW1 Domed Iron Cross 1st Class, 3rd Reich Production
III Reich produced 1914 cased domed Iron Cross 1st Class, (no makers mark), vaulted cross in extremely fine condition.. Early D & B type maker stamped domed top case. An absolute beauty. Made in the Nazi 3rd Reich era for WW1 Ist class Iron Cross veteran recipients who failed to receive their hard earned medal for bravery, and were still serving in the new Reich. This example the Iron Cross First Class could only be awarded for an act of outstanding bravery and also to one who had previously received the Iron Cross Second Class. Hence, the First Class was more restricted and more highly prized. When the Iron Cross First Class was awarded, the Iron Cross Second Class was signified with a small ribbon attached to a button. Adolf Hitler was awarded this identical type of 1st Class Iron Cross in WW1, and always wore it throughout WW2 with pride. Next to the Victoria Cross, it is the most famous medal in the world. The Iron Cross was awarded for bravery in battle as well as other conspicuous military contributions in a battlefield environment. In order to receive the Iron Cross 1st Class Heer and Waffen SS men would have to perform three to four further acts of courage from the one that earned him the 2nd Class; The Luftwaffe and Kriegsmarine had the following criteria; the award was regularly awarded to U-boat Commanders upon sinking 50,000 tons and to Luftwaffe pilots when they achieved six or seven confirmed
kills; Of course these were only guidelines, and a single act of great importance or a long steady career could earn the individual the Cross. The Iron Cross 2nd Class came with a ribbon and was worn in one of two different methods: When in formal dress, the entire cross was worn mounted alone or as part of a medal bar. For everyday wear, only the ribbon was worn from the second hole in the tunic button.
The Iron Cross is a black four-pointed cross with white trim, with the arms widening toward the ends, similar to a cross pattée. It was designed by the neoclassical architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel and reflects the cross borne by the Teutonic Knights in the 14th century.

Initially the Iron Cross was worn with the blank side out. This did not change until 1838 when the sprig facing could be presented.

Since the Iron Cross was issued over several different periods of German history, it was annotated with the year indicating the era in which it was issued. For example, an Iron Cross from the First World War bears the year "1914", while the same decoration from the Second World War is annotated "1939". The reverse of the 1870, 1914 and 1939 series of Iron Crosses have the year "1813" appearing on the lower arm, symbolizing the year the award was created. The 1813 decoration also has the initials "FW" for King Frederick William III, while the next two have a "W" for the respective kaisers, Wilhelm I and Wilhelm II. The final version shows a swastika. A cross was the symbol of the Teutonic Knights (a heraldic cross pattée), and the cross design (but not the specific decoration) has been the symbol of Germany's armed forces (now the Bundeswehr) since 1871. As with all our items, each one comes with our unique, lifetime guarantee, certificate of authenticity

Code: 19054Price: 495.00 GBP


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A Superb WW2 Kriegsmarine Deluxe Officers Dagger with Hanging Straps
High quality deluxe hammered scabbard type. The blade is plain that is much scarcer and rarer than the etched blade version. The standard scabbard was the lightning bolt type, the deluxe version was hand hammered. The silk and velvet backed straps are mounted with gilded alloy lions head buckles and fittings. A German naval dirk once used by a Kriegsmarine warship and U Boat officer. Original ivorine grip and wire binding, blade in jolly nice condition. The Kriegsmarine [War Navy] was the name of the Navy of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial German Navy of World War I and the inter-war Reichsmarine. The Kriegsmarine was one of three official branches of the Wehrmacht, the armed forces of Nazi Germany.

The Kriegsmarine grew rapidly during German naval rearmament in the 1930s (the Treaty of Versailles had limited the size of the German navy previously). In January 1939 Plan Z was ordered, calling for the construction of many naval vessels. The ships of the Kriegsmarine fought during the Spanish Civil War and World War II. The Commander-in-Chief of the Kriegsmarine (as for all branches of armed forces during the period of absolute Nazi power) was Adolf Hitler, who exercised his authority through the Oberkommando der Marine.

The Kriegsmarine's most famous ships were the U-boats, most of which were constructed after Plan Z was abandoned at the beginning of World War II. Wolfpacks were rapidly assembled groups of submarines which attacked British convoys during the first half of the Battle of the Atlantic but this tactic was largely abandoned in the second half of the war. Along with the U-boats, surface commerce raiders (including auxiliary cruisers) were used to disrupt Allied shipping in the early years of the war, the most famous of these being the heavy cruisers Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer and the battleship Bismarck. However, the adoption of convoy escorts, especially in the Atlantic, greatly reduced the effectiveness of commerce raiders against convoys.

Code: 19053Price: On Request


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A British Battle of Waterloo 1796 Light Dragoon Combat Sabre by Gill .
The very sword as was carried by such glorious British cavalry regiments as the 13th Light Dragoons at the 'Battle of Waterloo', some 200 years ago this very June. All over blackened finish, wooden ribbed grip. Sword combat cuts to leading top edge, no scabbard. Gill's semi deluxe etched mark and Warranted, and thus a very good chance used by the 13th LD as many of his contract swords were used by the 13th. A mighty swash buckling sabre from the era of the great Napoleonic Wars, The Peninsular War and Waterloo. With good traditional form blade. General signs of combat use and age wear, excellent blade with makers name, Gill and Warranted. Combat sword cuts to the edge. No scabbard. A traditional sabre of the British Cavalry Light Dragoons. An amazingly effective sword of good stout quality. British Light dragoons were first raised in the 18th century. Initially they formed part of a cavalry regiment (scouting, reconnaissance etc), but due to their successes in this role, (and also in charging and harassing the enemy), they soon acquired a reputation for courage and skill. Whole regiments dedicated to this role were soon raised; the 15th Light Dragoons 1759 were the first, followed by the 18th Light Dragoons and the 19th Light Dragoons.
The 13th Light Dragoons were initially heavy dragoons known as Richard Munden’s Regiment of Dragoons 1715. By 1751 the regiment title was simplified to the 13th Regiment of Dragoons and by 1783 had been converted to the light role. In 1796 a new form of sabre was designed by a brave and serving officer, Le Marchant. Le Marchant commanded the cavalry squadron during the Flanders campaign against the French (1793-94). Taking notice of comments made to him by an Austrian Officer describing British Troopers swordplay as "reminiscent of a farmer chopping wood", he designed a new light cavalry sword to improve the British cavalryman's success. It was adopted by the Army in 1797 and was used for 20 years. Le Marchant was highly praised by many for his superb design and he further developed special training and exercise regimes. King George IIIrd was especially impressed and learnt them all by heart and encouraged their use throughout the cavalry corps. For a reward Le Marchant was promoted to Lt Colonel and given command of the 7th Light Dragoons. He soon realized that the course for educating the officers in his own regiment would spread no further in the Army without suitably trained instructors. His vision was to educate officers at a central military college and train them in the art of warfare. Despite many objections and prejudices by existing powerful members of the establishment, he gained the support of the Duke of York in establishing the Royal Military College, later to become the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and the Army Staff College. In 1804 Le Marchant received the personal thanks of King George who said "The country is greatly indebted to you." In 1811, when nearing completion of this task, he was removed from his post as Lieutenant Governor of the College by Lord Wellington to command the heavy cavalry in the Peninsula. Appointed as Major General, he arrived in Lisbon fifteen days after leaving Portsmouth. On 22nd July 1812, Lord Wellington and the Allied Army of 48,500 men and 60 cannon were situated at Salamanca, Spain, against the French Commander Marshal Marmont. Wellington had ordered his baggage trains westwards to provide a covering force in the event of a full scale retreat, however Marmont mistakenly took the movement to be the retreat of the Army itself and ordered eight divisions of Infantry and a cavalry division westwards in an attempt to outflank the retreat. Wellington on seeing the enemy's army now spread out over four miles and therefore losing it's positional advantage, ordered the full attack. Le Marchant, at the head of one thousand British cavalry rode at a gallop towards the surprised French infantrymen, who had no time to form squares, and reduced their numbers greatly. The Heavy Brigade had received thorough training under Le Marchant and on reforming their lines charged repeatedly, until five battalions of the French left wing had been destroyed. After twenty minutes, in the final charge, Le Marchant fell from his horse having received a fatal musket shot and General Packenham who watched the attack later remarked " the fellow died sabre in hand…giving the most princely example".
Two days later, he was buried, in his military cloak, near an olive grove where he had fallen. Aged forty-six John Le Marchant was buried on the field of battle, however, a monument to him was erected in St Paul's Cathedral, London. The survival today of this sword is a testament to the now little known British hero, who, in many ways transformed the way that cavalry sword combat, and many military tactics were conducted for many decades after his valorous death. His fearsome sabre was, it is said, so feared by the French that protests were submitted to the British government stating that it was simply too gruesome for use in civilized warfare.

Code: 19052Price: 850.00 GBP


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A British Army WW2 Sten Gun
With removable stock. The MK III is an improved MKI. Probably the most famous Sub Machine Gun ever used by the British Army. Using 9mm cal pistol ammunition it enabled it to use captured Luger and P.38 pistol ammo as well as the German sub machine gun MP40 ammo. However it was designed to be overcharged so if the German forces captured our 9mm sten ammo it would damage their 9mm guns, such as the Luger and MP40. No British WW2 film was complete without British Special Forces using the Sten. Deactivated with certificate [1997] not for export or sale to under 18's.

Code: 19051Price: On Request


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British Indian.Silver 105th (Madras Light Infantry) Officer Glengarry Badge
Pre 1881 Silver coiled bugle horn couched within crowned sprays of laurel and palm, the horn with central floreate numerals “105, on the curl of the horn “Madras Light Infty.”. A scroll on the junction of the leaf sprays “Cede Nullis”.Sealed in 1876. Became the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in 1881 The 105th Regiment of Foot (Madras Light Infantry) was an infantry regiment of the British Army from 1862 to 1881, when it was amalgamated into The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment).

The regiment was originally raised by the Honourable East India Company in 1839 as the 2nd Madras (European) Regiment, redesignated the 2nd Madras (European) Light Infantry in 1842, and served in the Indian Mutiny of 1857. As with all other "European" units of the Company, they were placed under the command of the Crown in 1858, and formally moved into the British Army in 1862, ranked as the 105th Foot.

As part of the Childers Reforms in 1881, the regiment was amalgamated with the 51st (the 2nd Yorkshire West Riding) or King's Own Light Infantry Regiment to form The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment).

Code: 19050Price: On Request


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A Very Good and Sound & Sprauncy 1796 'Waterloo' Trooper's Battle Sword
The very sword as was carried by such glorious British cavalry regiments as the 13th Light Dragoons at the 'Battle of Waterloo', some 200 years ago this very June. All over blackened finish, leather grip. Sword combat cuts to leading top edge. With superb patinated surface showing no russetting at all, as one normally expect to see on 200 year old steel combat troopers swords. Makers stamp at the forte of Gill, and thus a good chance used by the 13th LD as many of his contract swords were used by the 13th. With good Crown 1 inspector's mark to the blade. A great swash buckling beauty of a combat sword, with no frills or fancy details, just standard regulation issue to British troopers in the late 1790's and used to incredible effect in combat in the Napoleonic Wars, the Peninsular campaign and Waterloo. Used by the great iconic front rank regiments such as the 10th, 13th & 15th Light Dragoons. An amazingly effective sword of good and fine quality. British Light dragoons were first raised in the 18th century. Initially they formed part of a cavalry regiment (scouting, reconnaissance etc), but due to their successes in this role, (and also in charging and harassing the enemy), they soon acquired a reputation for courage and skill. Whole regiments dedicated to this role were soon raised; the 15th Light Dragoons 1759 were the first, followed by the 18th Light Dragoons and the 19th Light Dragoons.
The 13th Light Dragoons were initially heavy dragoons known as Richard Munden’s Regiment of Dragoons 1715. By 1751 the regiment title was simplified to the 13th Regiment of Dragoons and by 1783 had been converted to the light role. In 1796 a new form of sabre was designed by a brave and serving officer, Le Marchant. Le Marchant commanded the cavalry squadron during the Flanders campaign against the French (1793-94). Taking notice of comments made to him by an Austrian Officer describing British Troopers swordplay as "reminiscent of a farmer chopping wood", he designed a new light cavalry sword to improve the British cavalryman's success. It was adopted by the Army in 1797 and was used for 20 years. Le Marchant was highly praised by many for his superb design and he further developed special training and exercise regimes. King George IIIrd was especially impressed and learnt them all by heart and encouraged their use throughout the cavalry corps. For a reward Le Marchant was promoted to Lt Colonel and given command of the 7th Light Dragoons. He soon realized that the course for educating the officers in his own regiment would spread no further in the Army without suitably trained instructors. His vision was to educate officers at a central military college and train them in the art of warfare. Despite many objections and prejudices by existing powerful members of the establishment, he gained the support of the Duke of York in establishing the Royal Military College, later to become the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and the Army Staff College. In 1804 Le Marchant received the personal thanks of King George who said "The country is greatly indebted to you." In 1811, when nearing completion of this task, he was removed from his post as Lieutenant Governor of the College by Lord Wellington to command the heavy cavalry in the Peninsula. Appointed as Major General, he arrived in Lisbon fifteen days after leaving Portsmouth. On 22nd July 1812, Lord Wellington and the Allied Army of 48,500 men and 60 cannon were situated at Salamanca, Spain, against the French Commander Marshal Marmont. Wellington had ordered his baggage trains westwards to provide a covering force in the event of a full scale retreat, however Marmont mistakenly took the movement to be the retreat of the Army itself and ordered eight divisions of Infantry and a cavalry division westwards in an attempt to outflank the retreat. Wellington on seeing the enemy's army now spread out over four miles and therefore losing it's positional advantage, ordered the full attack. Le Marchant, at the head of one thousand British cavalry rode at a gallop towards the surprised French infantrymen, who had no time to form squares, and reduced their numbers greatly. The Heavy Brigade had received thorough training under Le Marchant and on reforming their lines charged repeatedly, until five battalions of the French left wing had been destroyed. After twenty minutes, in the final charge, Le Marchant fell from his horse having received a fatal musket shot and General Packenham who watched the attack later remarked " the fellow died sabre in hand…giving the most princely example".
Two days later, he was buried, in his military cloak, near an olive grove where he had fallen. Aged forty-six John Le Marchant was buried on the field of battle, however, a monument to him was erected in St Paul's Cathedral, London. The survival today of this sword is a testament to the now little known British hero, who, in many ways transformed the way that cavalry sword combat, and many military tactics were conducted for many decades after his valorous death. His fearsome sabre was, it is said, so feared by the French that protests were submitted to the British government stating that it was simply too gruesome for use in civilized warfare.

Code: 19049Price: 1495.00 GBP


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Powerful Japanese Tachi Signed Echizen ju Harima Daijo fujiwara Shigetaka
Probably 3rd or 4th generation master smith Shigetaka circa 1660. Worthy of any great collection, or, to beautifully and tastefully enhance the décor of the finest quality home, albeit contemporary modern or traditional antique. From a Park Lane apartment to a Highland Castle this sword would grace any location it was placed. Completely original and untouched Edo period koshirae fittings, with a design of over lacquered crushed abalone shell saya. The blade has been repolished and looks magnificent!. It has a profound and bold undulating hamon of great beauty. Tachi are the Samurai swords worn on Court occasions by the Daimyo Lords of Japan. They are distinguished by the fact that they are worn with the cutting edge down, from one or two hangers in the centre of the saya. Katana are slid through the belt or Obi, and thus do not have these two hangers. Traditionally in the Edo era only Daimyo are allowed to wear Tachi and there were only about 50 Daimyo in any one period in all Japan.
In later Japanese feudal history, during the Sengoku and Edo periods, certain high-ranking warriors [daimyo] of what became the ruling class would wear their swords tachi mounted. This Tachi is fully Edo with all the fittings and blade from the Edo era. The Edo started with the Tokugawa, who ruled Japan for around 460 years and it was founded after the battle of Sekigahara in 1598. The Tokugawa unified Japan and created a lasting dynasty of military rulers like none that had been before. The most famous Shogun, Ieyasu Tokugawa had obliged the daimyo [the tachi wearing Japanese clan war lords] to pay homage to the Shogun every two years in a big, formal and costly procession to the court in Edo (Tokyo). The intention was to assure their loyalty and to weaken them by putting financial burdens on them.Imagawa Yoshimoto 1519 -1560) was one of the leading daimyo (feudal lords) in the Sengoku period Japan. Based in Suruga Province, he was one of the three daimyo that dominated the Tokaido region. He was also one of the dominant daimyo in Japan for a time, until his death in 1560

Code: 19048Price: 8950.00 GBP


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A Fabulous Admiral Lord Collingwoods Letters and 18th Century RN Cutlass
The very earliest form of British Naval iron figure of eight hilted cutlass, predating the 1804 regulation double disc or figure of eight cutlass, and a book described in it's day as one of the finest of it's kind and that every single naval officer ought to keep a copy in his cabin. This being the earliest type of Royal Naval cutlass it has a cylindrical folded sheet iron grip over a wooden form. The later 1804 has a ribbed, cast iron grip. This cutlass would have been used by the Royal Navy at the Battle of the First of June, the Battle of the Nile, and many hundreds of this type of cutlass were used the Battle of Trafalgar. In the early 1700s the most famous of cutlass designs was taken up by the Royal Navy. This was the "double disc" cutlass, perhaps invented by Thomas Hollier, which featured two discs of steel as a guard joined by a broad strip of metal to complete protection for the hand. Thousands of these weapons were turned out by a variety of manufacturers but since then remarkably few survive.Lord Collingwoods Letters fourth edition publd. 1829. Including a printed fold out plan of the Battle of Trafalgar at about noon. Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood (26 September 1748 – 7 March 1810) was an admiral of the Royal Navy, notable as a partner with Lord Nelson in several of the British victories of the Napoleonic Wars, and frequently as Nelson's successor in commands

Sailors received little training in sword technique and indeed these weapons were often snatched up at the last minute from chests kept on deck, either to repel boarders or to take on a boarding made against another ship.
Scabbards were not needed because a sailor would need his cutlass for immediate use in battle. However one in ten were made with scabbards for shore parties.
Boarding over the side of another ship in the days of sail was often a difficult affair. Sometimes the enemy's vessel could be much bigger than your own, or indeed much smaller, necessitating either a climb up the gunports and through the anti-boarding nettings of the other ship or a plunge down, probably on a rope's end, onto the deck of the smaller vessel.
At the encounter between the 14-gun Speedy and the 32-gun Gamo in 1801 a British boarding party led by Captain Thomas Cochrane took the Spanish frigate by boarding in a fierce action. The small British ship was manoeuvred to come close alongside the enemy and eventually under the Spanish guns' maximum depression. Then Cochrane led the entire 40 crew - except for eight casualties and the surgeon who was left at the wheel.

Armed with cutlasses, axes and pikes the British sailors fought ferociously in hand-to-hand combat with Cochrane calling loudly for another 50 fictitious reinforcements to follow. The Spanish flung down their weapons and surrendered. We have just received this cutlass back from our conservation workshop where it has been for three weeks undergoing hand conservation and it has returned in fine order.

Code: 19045Price: 1395.00 GBP


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German WW2 4cm Flak28 Shell Clip. Waffen Amt Marked Dated 1941
Maker jkg made by the King of Hungary's State Machineworks for the Wehrmacht of the Third Reich. The Wehrmacht used a number of Bofors guns which had been captured in Poland and France. The Kriegsmarine also operated some guns obtained from Norway.

In German naval use, the gun was designated the "4 cm Flak 28", and was used aboard the cruisers Admiral Hipper and Prinz Eugen toward the end of the war. Beginning in 1942, several E-boats were equipped with the Flak 28 to enable them to fight against British MGBs and MTBs on equal terms.
The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun, is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose autocannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers. The cannon remains in service (as the main armament in the CV 90) making it both one of the longest-serving and most widespread artillery pieces of all time. Bofors itself has been part of BAE Systems AB since March 2005.

Code: 19044Price: 45.00 GBP


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A German WW2 Messerschmitt Fighter Canon Shell From An ME109, ME262, ME110
Armour piercing shell. Fired by the MG151/20 cannon A fabulous but very scarcely seen original unfired 20mm cannon shell from a WW2 German fighter plane. All of the Messerschmitts including the jet, the ME262. Solid armour piercing late case shape. Inert, deactivated Not suitable for export. About the best, original 3rd Reich, small conversational piece, money can buy today. An ideal gentleman's desk ornament. All fully marked by German ordnance not suitable to export . For sale to over 18's only.

Code: 19043Price: 90.00 GBP

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